Category Archives: Education

Game Library Camp 17

If, like me, you were not able to attend the Game Library Camp on the 12th then watching this padlet may be of interest to you:

Made with Padlet

International Women’s Day Display Materials

March is Women’s History Month and Wednesday 8th March is International Women’s Day.

To mark the day I have been working on a display and creating rosettes with the colours of the Women’s Sufferage Movement and utilising classic and contemporary slogans.
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I have created a blank .pdf rosette that students can use to create their own, downloadable here:

Download (PDF, 164KB)

To go with the display I have been adapting classic photos of Suffragettes but with modern slogans on their banners.

These are downloadable here:

for-women-equal-pay for-women-attacked-by-feminism

Plagiarism Revisited

In 2014 I created a powerpoint for my students on plagiarism, using the example of Shia LeBoeuf and Daniel Clowes. You can see it here:

http://teenlibrarian.co.uk/2014/01/17/plagiarism/

It has been on e of the most popular resources on my site.

Since then there have been a number of other examples featuring people in the public eye that have come to light.

The most recent being Melania Trump being accused of plagiarising Michelle Obama’s speech:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/election-us-2016-36832095

Beyonce has also faced several charges of plagiarism during her career:

http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/beyonce-sued-over-lemonade-trailer-singers-history-plagiarism-complaints-1564560

Azealia Banks has also accused Zayn Malik of plagiarism as well as providing an example of how not to behave on social media, she has since also accused Lady Gaga and Taylor Swift of the same:

https://www.digitalmusicnews.com/2016/07/14/azealia-banks-causes-yet-another-stir-music-industry/

Using people in the public eye is a good way of engaging with students who may otherwise not show much interest in library lessons. I will just say as a word of caution that Azealia Banks has has used racially charged language – particularly against Zayn Malik so it may be worth making sure that any links used will not cause a backlash against the library due to language.

World Book Day 2016 Quiz

Download the Quiz from Dropbox here

Quiz Answers

Library Lessons: What is a Word?

A discussion on words and the Oxford Dictionaries Word of the Year leading into creating emoji book reviews

#ParisAttacks Display

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I started planning a display on the Paris Attacks the day after they happened. Initially I was planning on using reports from the various news agencies around the world to give an international perspective on what was happening in Paris. This idea did not last long as there was so much information being generated that I could have papered the library with everything that was available.

Another are of concern was the fact that as a boarding school, I work with a large number of students that have English as a second language and I wanted one display for everyone. Fortunately The Day has created a report on the attacks that they have made free to use

I also used the sketch by French artist Jean Jullien,

peace paris

the teachings of Islam from a tweet by Khaled AL Homsi

to show that what the terrorists do is not in the name of the faith they profess

and the joint statement from the London Mosques denouncing this crime against humanity.

I included a travel guide on Paris, the World Book Encyclopedia entry on Paris as well as a book on being Muslim, The Times and The Guardian newspapers from today, an explanation of why Da’esh is being used by a growing number of people and organisations instead of ISIS & ISIL and three general information books on terrorism.

Lastly, I added a sketch from French cartoonist & film-maker Joann Sfar to stimulate conversation about religion and secularism

paris sfar

Book Review Bunting

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Over the past few years of being a school librarian I have been using reading passports/diaries to help students keep track of their reading. These schemes were all relatively successful but did not really work well when it came to encouraging students to pick up books that others had read.

This year I have started an ongoing project to create book review bunting. I have asked every student in years 7,8 & 9 to write a short review on the back of an image of a library book that they have enjoyed and use it to create bunting to decorate the library. The bunting will be hung low enough for students to reach & read what others think about the book, I am hoping that this will encourage them to hunt down and read the book itself.

At the end of the year I am hoping to have introduced as many students as possible to new books via peer review and also decorate the library with bunting that mirrors the collection. It will also be interesting to see what the most popularly reviewed books are.

Creating a Thirst for Knowledge: The Dawn of the Unread

dawnoftheunread

Nottingham Trent University won the Teaching Excellence Award for The Dawn of the Unread online, interactive comic.

Incensed by the closures of libraries and low literacy in 21st-century Britain, the famous historical literary figures of Nottingham rise from the grave to wreak revenge.

Find out more about the project here:
http://www.theguardian.com/higher-education-network/2015/mar/19/teaching-excellence-category-awards-winner-and-runners-up

Visit the Dawn of the Unread website here and be inspired: http://www.dawnoftheunread.com/

The remit of Dawn of the Unread is not to thrust ‘complex’ books on people to read. It’s to create a thirst for knowledge. To tease, tantalise and inspire. To use digital technology to enable numerous routes into literature knowing that our reading paths are ultimately solitary and taken at different speeds. And if kids go on to the library to get out books it will be because they want to learn more.

Read the full manifesto for Dawn of the Unread here

YALSA’s Competencies for Librarians Serving Youth: Young Adults Deserve the Best

If you are interested in becoming a teen librarian or helping out with working with young people in public libraries then check out YALSA’s competencies, developed through decades of work with young people.

YALSA first developed these competencies in 1981, which were revised in 1998, 2003, and 2010. The competencies can be used as a tool to evaluate and improve service, a foundation for library school curriculum, a framework for staff training and a set of guiding principles for use when speaking out for the importance of services to teens in libraries.

Audiences for the competencies include:

Library educators
School and library administrators
Graduate students
Young adult specialists
School librarians
Library training coordinators
Public library generalists
Human resources directors
Non-library youth advocates and service providers

Download the competencies here:

http://www.ala.org/yalsa/guidelines/yacompetencies2010

Library Lessons: Emoji Reviews

I do not know about anyone else but sometimes getting students to write reviews is akin to getting blood from a rock.

No matter how many times I show examples of good reviews or give out review questions to help students write their reviews but from a large percentage of them all I get reviews like:

“I enjoyed this book”

“It is a good book”

“This book is funny it made me laugh”

I know for a percentage of the classes I work with reading is a chore and not something that they really enjoy so this coming year I will be trying something different.

Instead of a written review I will ask them to use emoji to give an outline of what the book is about and what they thought about it. It will force them to actually think about what they have read either a novel, short story or comic book and engage their non-language communication skills as well as their creativity.

For this exercise I will allow them to use their mobile phones in the lesson

For example:


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In the days running up to the lessons I will use emoji posters to recommend books for students to hopefully catch their interest.