Category Archives: News

Library A to Z

libraryaz
The launch of the Library A to Z will happen during the week 17th – 22nd November. Packs including copies of books and other materials will be sent to local, national and international politicians.

The aim of this action is to highlight the continued importance and value of library services, to encourage continued investment.

What is the Library A to Z you may ask… well it is a campaign created by librarian Gary Green, researcher Andrew Walsh and artist Jose Filhol to highlight the breadth of services, resources and facilities available, and celebrate the importance, value and relevance of well-funded and professionally-run public libraries.

It is this A to Z that has turned into the illustrations and promotional and advocacy material that is freely available for use on this site. The services, along with the words that have been turned into the illustrated letters, aren’t comprehensive, but are just a representative sample.

From

az1library
 
 
is for access; advice; answers; archives; art (view public art and sometimes borrow it too!); astronomy (some libraries loan out telescopes for stargazing); audio books; author events.
white barrier
to

az2library
 
 
 
 
is for ‘zines (magazines); zzzzz (child sleeping after being read bedtime story).
 
 
 

white barrier
Find out all about the project here:

http://www.libraryatoz.org/

Dyslexia, Dictionaries, Fonts & Learning

There is a new dictionary coming out at some point in 2015, many people may not think that this news is particularly earth-shattering as dictionaries are printed and published all over the world. The thing that makes this one special is that it is aimed squarely at people with dyslexia.

Known as the Maple Mayes Dictionary after the school where the idea has been in development for quite some time.

Father and son duo Dr Neville and Dr Daryl Brown have dedicated their lives to developing new methods that can help children to overcome dyslexia – a pursuit that led them to open specialist Staffordshire-based teaching and research centre, Maple Hayes Dyslexia School, in 1982.

Now, after almost 25 years analysing the way dyslexics learn, the Browns have decided to rewrite the dictionary after identifying that its layout, which is biased towards phonetic language, proves to be a huge stumbling block for youngsters with dyslexia. The traditional dictionary – as its name indicates – was originally a tool primarily to promote the correct pronunciation of words.

This is fantastic news; I work with a number of dyslexic students and am excited at the thought of being able to offer a new resource to help them learn.

I found out about the dictionary while reading an article on the NPR website about dyslexic fonts and their development.

The Dyslexie font has been around for quite some time, but reading about it and how it works has given me a new appreciation for the amount of work that has gone into its development, I was also not properly aware of how it worked, apart from the font being weighted – but that is only a part of how it makes words easier to read.

How the font works:

Dyslexie-typeface-by-Christian-Boer-dezeen_468_2_1000

Further information:

Lichfield father and son re-write dictionary to help dyslexic children

Christian Boer Designs Typeface for Students with Dyslexia

Dyslexia Typeface

Maple Hayes School

Specialist Dyslexia School Rewrites the Dictionary

Spotting Dyslexia May Be Possible Even Before Kids Learn To Read

Project ReMix

The competition is open to UK residents age 13-19: to enter, teenagers are asked to make their own creative work in response to a selection of books, stories, poems and graphic novels from some of the best-selling contemporary and classic authors, including: John Green, Suzanne Collins, Philip Pullman, Benjamin Zephaniah, Jane Austen, Arthur Conan Doyle and Bram Stoker.

Entries can be submitted in five categories:

Music
Book cover design
Book trailer
Creative writing
Comic strip

The aim of Project Remix is to engage young people with literature, using it as a creative springboard into other storytelling mediums, and to open doors to the arts and the creative industries. The competition was inspired by the growth of online fandom, including fan-fiction and fan art and the surge in related digital communities.

Find out more about the competition, including how to enter, at www.projectremix.co.uk

The Power of Reading: A YLG London training day

YLG London are delighted to announce that the booking period is open for this years One Day School entitled ‘The Power of Reading’. We have a great line up of authors, practitioners, librarians and speakers from across a range of organisations coming together to deliver this course. The Course aims, objectives, programme and booking form are included in the body of this email. If you would like further information, please don’t hesitate to contact Simon.

Friday 14th November 2014

CILIP
7 Ridgmount Street
London WC1E 7AE

COURSE AIMS AND OBJECTIVES

This course is aimed at frontline library staff working with the public and Librarians with an interest in promoting stock and engaging readers. The course will provide;

· Practical advice for engaging with young people

· Ideas for reading promotion

· Raised stock awareness

· Raised awareness of the wider literary network

BOOKING INSTRUCTIONS

Course Fee

£50 + VAT CILIP Personal members

£55 + VAT Non members

£40 + VAT Unwaged

Places are limited to 40 and will be confirmed in writing or by e-mail on a first come first served basis. To book a place, please complete the enclosed booking form including your CILIP membership number if applicable and return to:

Simon Smith
YLG London
62 Belmont Road
Reading
RG30 2UU
simonsmith78@btinternet.com

COURSE OUTLINE

08:45 Registration

09:30 Welcome and Introductions

09:35 Power of Reading

Keynote speaker: Julia Eccleshare MBE

10:15 Power of Awards

Panel discussion

Fen Coles – Letterbox Library

Emily Drabble – Guardian

Clare Shanahan – Booktrust

11:10 Break

11:30 Power of Poetry – bringing poetry to life

Performance poet Joe Coelho

12:00 Power of Performance

Group discussions – using examples of books – what can you draw out of books to inspire and motivate – activities/success stories

12:55 Summary of morning

13:00 Lunch

14:00 Power of Summer

Getting the best from the Summer Reading Challenge – Sarah Mears

14:30 Group discussions – what works/doesn’t/ideas

15:00 Power of Authors

Panel discussion with:

Rob Lloyd Jones

Katie May Green

Rob Biddulph

Piers Torday

15:55 Summary of afternoon

16:00 Refreshments and Book Signing. Books on Sale Big Green Bookshop

The CILIP Carnegie & Kate Greenaway (CKG) Awards process

  • The Awards are overseen by the Youth Libraries Group (YLG) which is a special interest group within the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP)
  • Books can be nominated by any member of CILIP
  • Each member can nominate up to two books for each award
  • The CKG Judges as CILIP members are also allowed to nominate titles
  • Nominations for the 2015 Awards were open from the 1st September to the 6th October
  • Nominated titles are then checked for eligibility by the CKG Working Party & CILIP:

    Titles must have been first published in the UK between 1 September 2013 and 31 August 2014

    Books first published in another country must have been co-published in the UK within three months of the original publication date

  • When the nominations lists are made public the judges receive a full set of each of the Awards titles and start reading
  • From the nominations list a long-list of around 20 titles is selected by the judges working together under guidance from the Chair of Judges and referring to the full criteria for each award
  • The long-list is then be made public (10th February 2015)
  • The judges revisit and reread each of the books and scrutinise them even more closely before making a decision on short-listing, selecting six to eight of the titles for the short-list
  • The short-list is then made public (17th March 2015)
  • The hardest part of the judges’ task begins: selecting the most outstanding titles from the short-list
  • The winning titles are made public in June.
  •  
    The CILIP Carnegie Medal is awarded annually for an outstanding book for children and young people
    The Carnegie Award is a gold medal and comes with £500 worth of books that the author can donate to the library of their choice.

    The CILIP Kate Greenaway Medal is awarded annually for an outstanding book in terms of illustration for children and young people
    The Kate Greenaway Award is also a gold medal and comes with £500 worth of books but also the Colin Mears Award which is a £5000 bequest left to the winner of the Kate Greenaway Award by Colin Mears, this has been awarded annually since the year 2000.

    Doctor Who: Friendly Dalek teaches you to code

    The BBC has unveiled a computer game called The Doctor and the Dalek, as part of the Make it Digital initiative to get more young people into computer coding.

    It is voiced by Peter Capaldi and the story, starring a friendly Dalek, is written by Doctor Who series writer Phil Ford.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-29645991

    First Story National Writing Competition

    First Story is very excited to announce the launch of its annual National Writing Competition!

    Students from state schools across the country are invited to submit 850 words or less of poetry or prose on the theme of ‘Home’ – what does home mean to them? Is it a place, a smell, a taste, a group of people?

    This year we are delighted to offer the fantastic prize of a residential Arvon creative writing course for the winners. We will also publish all the shortlisted pieces in a collected anthology, and hold a special prize-giving ceremony at LSE in 2015.

    The competition will be judged by five acclaimed writers: Anthony McGowan, Bernardine Evaristo, James Dawson, Kate Kingsley and Laura Dockrill.

    Teachers will run the first stage of the competition within schools, and then send 3 top entries to First Story before the deadline on Friday 5th December 2014. The first 100 teachers to get 50 entries within their school will be given £100, and £30 in book tokens will be given to every school to be awarded to the top three winners within each school.

    Four stories from each key stage (KS3, 4 and 5, twelve stories in total) will be selected by First Story from the final entries submitted by each school, and then the five judges will pick a winner for each key stage. One winner overall will be selected, with the results announced in a prize ceremony at the London School of Economics & Political Science (LSE) in early 2015. The three key stage winners will each be offered a places on an Arvon residential writing course in March 2015. And on top of that, they get to invite 3 friends to come on the course too, and bring the teacher who entered their piece along with them.

    Teachers can also enter themselves, in a separate contest: 4 top teacher pieces will be chosen, and a final winner, selected by the judges, will also get a place on the Arvon course.

    For full details and resources please visit this page:

    http://www.firststory.org.uk/2014/09/24/first-story-national-writing-competition/

    Bloomsbury launches HARRY POTTER BOOK NIGHT

    HPBN-logox
    February 5th 2015 will see the first ever Harry Potter Book Night. This exciting event will give new and existing fans a chance to share the wonder of J.K. Rowling’s unforgettable stories and, most excitingly, to introduce the next generation of readers to the unparalleled magic of Harry Potter. You are hereby invited to embrace the magic and banish the midwinter blues!

    Bloomsbury Children’s Books is inviting schools, bookshops, libraries and community groups to host early evening events in celebration of Harry Potter Book Night. Bloomsbury is creating a complete Harry Potter Book Night Kit – available for free download – offering hosts everything they need to plan an unforgettable evening. The kit will include invitation templates, an event poster, games, activities and quizzes as well as ideas for dressing up and decorating the venue. The kit will be available from the new website harrypotterbooknight.com. Event hosts can register now at the site to receive the kit and updates in the run up to the big night.

    In addition to the community events outlined above, there will be public events in London and key regions, a major competition for UK and Irish schools and many further treats and surprises – all celebrating J.K. Rowling’s seven iconic Harry Potter books – to be revealed soon.

    Bloomsbury Children’s Books will be marking Harry Potter Book Night on February 5th in their key territories, giving fans across the world an opportunity to join in the celebrations.

    Bloomsbury is working closely with Harry Potter partners on plans for the inaugural Harry Potter Book Night, and this interactive celebration joins the new Jonny Duddle jackets, Harry Potter book festival events and the Jim Kay illustrated editions publishing October 2015 as part of a wider strategy from Bloomsbury to pass the magic of these unique adventures on to as many readers as possible.

    Find out more details here

    Top 10 Myths about Teenagers (link)

    Stewart Ross has written a brilliant article detailing 10 pernicious myths about teenagers.

    Have a read here:

    Top 10 Myths About Teenagers

    The Clore Poetry and Literature Awards

    The Clore Poetry and Literature Awards fund poetry and literature initiatives for children and young people, under the age of 19, across the UK. Individual Awards range from £1,000 to £10,000. The Clore Duffield Foundation has created these Awards with the aim of providing children and young people with opportunities to experience poetry and literature in exciting and compelling ways, in and out of school.

    Get full details here: Clore Poetry and Literature Awards