Category Archives: News

All the World’s a Story: the CILIP School Libraries Group Conference

CILIP’s SLG the School Libraries Group has organised their National conference to take place from the 27th to the 29th April.

To find out what is on the programme and to download a booking form visit the SLG blog here:

All the World’s a Story: the CILIP School Libraries Group Conference 2018

The Wikipedia Library One Librarian One Reference Project 2018 #1Lib1Ref

Starting today and running until 3rd February, Wikipedia is hoping to entice Librarians into helping them make their online encyclopaedia more accurate by adding one reference to an article to help it become more reliable then adding #1Lib1Ref in the edit summary to help them track participation.

How to Participate: Five Basic Steps

  • Find an article that needs a citation. There are many ways to do this. Here are some strategies.
  • Filling a “Citation Needed” using Citation Hunt
  • Finding an article with sourcing problems
  • Select an article while browsing
  • Cite a source from your collection or research
  • Find a reliable source that can support that article
  • Add a citation using Wikipedia Style. Click here to learn about adding citations and editing Wikipedia
  • Add the project hashtag #1Lib1Ref in the Wikipedia Edit Summary
  • Share your edit on social media and learn more about libraries and Wikipedia. Grab a userbox for your user page if you’re into that sort of thing.
  • For full details, links to start pages and more information visit:
    https://meta.wikimedia.org/wiki/The_Wikipedia_Library/1Lib1Ref to sign up and help them out!

    Coram Voice’s creative writing competition for children in care and young care leavers returns #Voices2018

    Coram Voice is excited to announce the return of ‘Voices’, its national writing competition for children in care and young care leavers, for a third year running. The competition is open for entries until 8 February 2018.

    Coram Voice, a charity that provides a range of services for children and young people in and around the care system, first launched the competition in 2016 as a platform for care-experienced young people to express their creative talents and to celebrate their voices.

    Research conducted with previous Voices shortlisted entrants found that participation in the competition had inspired them to write more, allowed them to be recognised for their talents and for some, even helped them to come to terms with being in care.

    The theme of this year’s competition is Who or What Makes You Proud and entries can be submitted online at coramvoice.org.uk/voices18 in any written form including poems, short stories, raps and newspaper articles with a 500 word limit. The competition is grouped in four age categories: primary school, lower secondary school (age 11-14), upper secondary school (age 15-18) and care leavers.

    The entries for Voices 2018 will be judged by a panel of experts, each with personal experience of, or a special interest in the care system including:

  • Jackie Long, Social Affairs Editor for Channel 4 News
  • Lucy Spraggan, singer-songwriter, and newly approved foster carer
  • Ashley John-Baptiste, BBC reporter and producer
  • Jenny Molloy, author of ‘Hackney Child’
  • Mr Gee, spoken word artist
  • Lola Jaye, author of ‘Orphan Sisters’
  • Lisa Cherry, author of ‘The Brightness of Stars’
  • Dreadlock Alien, slam and performance poet
  • The winner of each category will receive a tablet and £100 shopping vouchers, and will be announced by the judges at an awards ceremony in London on 9 April 2018.

    One of the judges, Lola Jaye commented: I know that storytelling is one of the most powerful ways we can understand each other’s unique experiences. That’s why I am so pleased to judge Voices 2018, a competition that amplifies the voices of young people in the care system and gives them a platform to tell the world their stories. I can’t wait to read what they produce and celebrate their achievements.

    One young person who previously entered Voices said: The competition is a safe opportunity to share your personal story – it’s a wonderful way to embrace your history and yourself” and another added “to put what you feel on a piece of paper is quite therapeutic.

    Another previous entrant commented: It can be the start of a journey… it opens up new opportunities and also shows people the potential you have.

    Voices 2018 is open for entries until 8 February 2018. For more information about the competition and how to enter, please visit coramvoice.org.uk/voices18.

    The Wilbur & Niso Smith Foundation 2018 Adventure Writing Prize

    Adventure is a broad genre and thrillers, crime, historical fiction or fantasy novels are often also adventure stories. With prizes from £1,500 – £15,000 and categories for young people to published authors, it’s an opportunity not to be missed.

    Published Novel | Prize: £15,000

    Novels must be published between 1st January 2017 and 30th April 2018. Proof copies are accepted.

    Unpublished Manuscript | Prize: £7,500 Writer’s Adventure Research Award and guidance from Wilbur’s literary agents

    Novels must be 50,000+ words in length and authors not represented by a literary agent. Self-published books are eligible.

    Author of Tomorrow – short stories by writers aged 21 years and under | Prize: £1,500 and digital publication

    Entrants must be aged 21 years and under at time of submission. Stories must be between 1,500 and 5,000 words.

    Deadline for submissions: 12th March 2018

    Full details are available on our website at: www.wilbur-niso-smithfoundation.org/awards

    CILIP Carnegie & Kate Greenaway Independent Review

    In June 2017 CILIP launched an independent review of the CILIP Carnegie & Kate Greenaway Medals as part of their Equalities and Diversity Action Plan.

    Today an interim report to provide an update on the work of the review has been released.

    The Bookseller has a brilliant article that summarises the findings so far, you can read it here: ‘No more buck-passing’, says Carnegie Diversity report

    To read the full report and register to take part in the consultation here: CILIP Carnegie Kate Greenaway Independent Review

    CILIP Letter to Justine Greening

    On Thursday Dawn Finch, Immediate Past President of CILIP – the library and information association wrote to Secretary of State for Education Justine Greening MP calling on her to intervene to halt the shocking decline of library provision and the numbers of qualified librarians in state-funded schools and colleges in England.

    Over 150 authors, educators and many other supporters of school and college libraries put their names to this letter urging the government to change their policy of leaving the decision to have school libraries up to individual heads as this clearly has not worked.

    read the full letter here: School Libraries SOS

    Love Your School Library Service Day


    Books in Your Classroom

    Download (PDF, 249KB)


    Curriculum Resources

    Download (PDF, 901KB)


    Access to a Library Management System

    Download (PDF, 236KB)


    The School Library Award (accredited by ASCEL, SLG and SLA)

    Download (PDF, 206KB)


    Setting Up Your School Library

    Download (PDF, 864KB)

    When you don’t like the story the world is telling you, tell a different story.

    50 leading authors and illustrators have come together to produce a crowd-funded collection of stories, poetry and artwork with all profits going to UNHCR, the UN Refugee Agency.

    Alt-Write: creative reactions to uncertain times is a collection of new previously unpublished stories*, poems and illustrations from leading names in the children’s book world.

    The past year has delivered a tumultuous series of world events that has left people reeling. Authors and illustrators asked themselves what they could do to help and the answer was to do what we do best, to write and draw and create.

    When you don’t like the story the world is telling, tell a different story.

    Our role is to debunk xenophobic myths and make people think, help them discover the natural human quality of empathy.
    Alan Gibbons, author

    It’s wonderful that so many great literary voices are contributing their creativity and compassion to this project, and showing that they stand with refugees
    Laura Padoan, a spokesperson for UNHCR.

    Contributors to this new collection include

  • Carnegie award-winning author Frank Cottrell Boyce
  • Poet Laureate Carol Ann Duffy
  • Scottish Makar and Guardian-award winning poet Jackie Kay
  • Winner of the Waterstones Children’s Book Prize for Older Children 2017 and The Bookseller prize, Patrice Lawrence
  • Rising star and multiple award winning illustrator Sarah McIntyre
  • Carnegie and Guardian prize winning novelist Susan Price
  • Former Children’s Laureate and three-times winner of the Kate Greenaway award, Chris Riddell
  • Celebrated poet and former Children’s Laureate Michael Rosen.
  • Best-selling illustrator Nick Sharratt
  • Guardian prize winning novelist and poet, Alex Wheatle the Brixton Bard
  • Winner of a World Fantasy Award for Life Achievement, Jane Yolen
  • And a host of other leading, award-winning and talented authors and illustrators
     
    In the first week of our campaign
     

  • 8 of our authors have been nominated for this year’s Carnegie award and 1 for the Greenaway award. They are: Alan Gibbons, Mary Hoffman, Patrice Lawrence, Tanya Landman, Irfan Master, Michael Rosen, Chris Priestley, Alex Wheatle and Jane Ray.
  • Neil Gaiman and Cory Doctorow have both tweeted about the book
  • 2 of our illustrators (Chris Riddell and John Shelley) have been nominated for the Astrid Lingren Memorial Award
     
    What’s new
     

  • Original Jane Ray artwork as a crowd-funding reward.
  • Promotional video from Alex Wheatle reading his hard-hitting new poem And I Still Hear Nina Singing Mississipi Goddam
     
    The #altwrite team
     
    Editors Mary Hoffman and Rhiannon Lassiter are a mother and daughter team with a proven track record in publishing. In 2003 they co-edited Lines in the Sand: New writing on war and peace published by Frances Lincoln in the UK and The Disinformation Press in the US. All the contributors’ royalties and the publishers’ profits went to UNICEF’s emergency appeal for the children of Iraq.
     
    Links
     
    Campaign page on IndieGoGo: http://igg.me/at/alt-write
    Website: http://www.alt-write.org
    Twitter: http://twitter.com/altwriteproject

  • Hay Levels series 3 launches: Free video resources for A Level students

    World-leading writers and thinkers have joined together to launch the third series of Hay Levels: an inspiring, free series of educational videos from Hay Festival in which experts from a range of disciplines offer inspiration for A Level students, including Michael Rosen, Marcus du Sautoy, Laura Bates, Sarah Churchwell, Lawrence Krauss, Sir Nicholas Hytner, Colm Toíbín, Philippe Sands, Janina Ramirez, Anne-Marie Imafiddon, Robbert Dijkgraaf, Dr Kourosh Saeb Parsy, James Holland, Dr Helen Rappaport, Dr Gabrielle Walker, Dr Oscar Guardioula-Rievera, Gilliant Tett, Jerry Brotton, Alexander Todorov, Miriam Gonzalez Durantez, Carlo Rovelli, Dame Nemat Shafik, Dame Athene Donald and Catherine Barnard.

    Matched to current A Level subject curricula, Hay Levels are video masterclasses given by the world’s greatest teachers, thinkers and writers. From the black holes to the Great War to the big thaw, from Frankenstein to immunity to globalisation, and from sex to cosmology to crime; Hay Levels offer bite-size inspiration for curious students.

    Videos will be released fortnightly throughout the school year on the Hay Levels YouTube channel (subscribe here) and shared across social media (#HayLevels), supplementing the growing bank of content already available online.

    https://www.youtube.com/user/HayLevels
    Hay Levels is a joint collaboration between Hay Festival and Hereford Sixth Form College, in partnership with the Tata group, giving students open access to some of the most renowned experts in their fields.

    The first release of videos this academic year features:

  • Rosalind Rickaby on chemical equilibrium
  • Lawrence Krauss on cosmology
  • Marcus du Sautoy on algebra
  • Sarah Churchwell on Edith Wharton
  • Sir Nicholas Hytner on Hamlet
  • Michael Rosen on Geoffrey Chaucer’s The Pardoner’s Tale
  • Lord Digby Jones on profit
  • Catherine Barnard on Brexit
  • Anne-Marie Imafidon MBE on binary numbers
  • Philippe Sands on international crime
  • Peter Singer on utilitarianism
  •  Now in its third year, the Hay Levels project was inspired after mathematician Marcus du Sautoy gave an impromptu masterclass to a group of A Level students on his way to speak at Hay Festival. Since then, speakers appearing at Hay Festival events in Wales and around the world have been invited to contribute to the growing bank of free resources online.

    Peter Florence, Director of Hay Festival, said: Our work to bring writers and readers together in conversations and debate continues to develop digitally. Hay Levels extend the great breadth of knowledge of Hay Festival experts to A Level students across the country. We hope they will be widely used and shared and are deeply grateful to these fabulous academics that have supported us so far. And, of course, while these resources have been designed with A Level students in mind, it’s not to say everyone can’t learn something from them.

    Dr David Landsman OBE, Executive Director of the Tata group, said: “Tata shares Hay Festival’s commitment to education and skills and we are proud to partner with the Hay Levels for the third time this year. Education is key to success in everything Tata does, which is why we are continuously investing in skills, not only for our companies, but also in the communities we work in. We hope that that this year’s videos will help to inspire and educate the engineers, business leaders, academics and creative thinkers of the future.”

    Highlights from the first two series of Hay Levels include: Sarah Churchwell on Gatsby; David Crystal on Pragmatics; Richard Dawkins on Irreducible Complexity; Stephen Fry on Exam Tips; Angie Hobbs on Platonic Ethics and Laura Bates on Rape.

    Hay Levels is part of the wider Hay Festival education work, which includes free Schools Days programming, Hay Academy, and Hay Compass.

    For more information on Hay Levels or Hay Festival, please visit hayfestival.org.

    Is It A Plane? Is It A Library? No It’s A Flybrary!

    EASYJET’S BOOK CLUB LIFTS OFF TO GET CHILDREN HOOKED ON A BOOK THIS SUMMER

  • easyJet launches new initiative to encourage children to get into a good book by installing holiday reading libraries across its entire UK fleet this summer
  • Campaign follows research by easyJet, which reveals that over 8 in 10 British parents (83%) say children are reading less in comparison to when they were younger
  • Campaign ambassador and leading children’s author Dame Jacqueline Wilson has selected books for kids to enjoy in-flight
  • Children’s classics including; Peter Pan, Alice’s Adventures In Wonderland, The Railway Children and The Wizard of Oz, will be made available in passenger seat-pockets
  • The easyJet Book Club will see seven thousand copies of the books take to the skies as 147 ‘Flybraries’ lift off today
  • Statistics from the Department of Education show that one in five children in England cannot read well by the age of 11*
  • Figures from the National Foundation of Education Research show most children in England do not read on a daily basis with just over a third (37%) of 10 year-olds surveyed reported reading for pleasure every day**
  • easyJet launch new 'Flybraries' from Taylor Herring on Vimeo.

    LONDON, Tuesday 18th July 2017: Europe’s leading airline easyJet have launched a new initiative today to launch ‘Flybraries’ (flying libraries) following new research that suggests that the number of children reading for pleasure is at an all-time low.

    This summer easyJet will fly 750,000 families out of UK airports on their holidays. That means it has a unique opportunity to get kids hooked on a book while they’re on the plane.

    Former Children’s Laureate Dame Jacqueline Wilson, who is supporting the Flybrary campaign designed to promote literacy and encourage kids to read, has selected a range of classic children’s books to be stocked on board that encompass the spirit of travel and adventure. Dame Jacqueline unveiled her selection at the official launch of the Book Club at Gatwick Airport.

    Seven thousand copies of children’s classics including Peter Pan, Alice’s Adventures In Wonderland, The Wizard Of Oz, and The Railway Children will be made available on easyJet’s UK fleet of 147 aircraft as the new holiday reading campaign takes flight today across European destinations for free. Kids can start reading them on the flight and then when they land download free samples of other classics to try, plus a sample of Wilson’s latest bestseller, Wave Me Goodbye, from easyjet.com/bookclub. Children will leave the books on board for the next passenger to enjoy.

    Speaking at London Gatwick Airport where she launched the initiative, Dame Jacqueline Wilson, whose 106 children’s books have collectively sold over 40 million copies in the UK alone, said: The long summer break is the ideal opportunity for children to get stuck into a great story. Books stimulate a child’s imagination and development. Reading soothes, entertains, grows vocabulary and exercises the mind and a flight is the perfect place to escape into a literary adventure. That’s why I think this campaign is such a clever match. I’ve chosen books that children might not have 
read, but are familiar with, maybe from film and television. I also
wanted stories that would appeal equally to boys and girls.

    easyJet CEO Carolyn McCall said: This summer easyJet will transport three quarters of a million families from UK airports to popular holiday destinations across Europe – the largest number yet due to our range of parent-friendly initiatives to make it easier for parents and kids alike. The launch of our summer kids book club is another initiative designed to make flying with us more fun and help to get kids hooked on a book at the start of the holiday season at the same time. Our in-flight lending library means young passengers can pick up a brilliant book during their flight and then return it to the seat pocket at the end of the flight for the next customer to enjoy onboard. We think it will be popular with parents and children alike.

    The initiative follows research by easyJet who polled 2,000 British parents with children aged 8 – 12, which reveals that over 8 in 10 parents (83%) say children are reading less in comparison to when they were younger. The research reveals that kids are reading an average of three books over the course of their entire summer holidays, in contrast to an average of four books which their parents would have devoured at the same age – a drop of 25% over the course of a generation.

    The study found that the majority of respondents (84%) agreed that people tended to read more for pleasure 25 years ago than they do today, due to us living in a fast moving digital world with endless entertainment options. The research reveals a seismic shift in reading across generations, with the decline in the number of books being read by children today attributed to the vast choice of entertainment available to them on digital devices.

    Statistics from the Department of Education show that one in five children in England cannot read well by the age of 11*. Figures from the National Foundation of Education Research show most children in England do not read on a daily basis with just over a third (37%) of 10 year-olds surveyed reported reading for pleasure every day**.

    Gatwick Airport’s Head of Terminals & Passenger Services Nikki Barton said: We are right behind this brilliant summer initiative by easyJet and were honoured to welcome Dame Jacqueline to Gatwick to launch the Book Club and sign some of her books for our younger passengers. There’s nothing like a great book, and kids heading off to the many holiday destinations served by easyJet from Gatwick this summer will certainly have plenty to keep them amused on-board.

    Of those surveyed, nine in ten parents (90%) said that they believed the breadth of electronic entertainment devices available to children has led to a decline in reading for pleasure.

    Questioned on why they believe this trend has occurred, over a half (57%) said it was due to an increase of availability of digital devices from a young age.

    Furthermore, of those surveyed eight in ten (80%) believe that the widespread presence of digital entertainment has had an adverse effect on literacy levels. Over half (53%) of British parents charted the rise of ‘digital devices’ (smartphones and tablets) as a reason for the decline in children reading for pleasure on holiday.

    * Statistics from the Department of Education show that one in five children in England cannot read well by the age of 11 – https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/409409/Reading_the_next_steps.pdf

    **Figures from the National Foundation of Education Research show most children in England do not read on a daily basis: in 2011 just over a third (37%) of 10 year-olds surveyed reported reading for pleasure every day- https://www.nfer.ac.uk/publications/PRTZ01/PRTZ01.pdf