Category Archives: Library Lessons

Plagiarism Revisited

In 2014 I created a powerpoint for my students on plagiarism, using the example of Shia LeBoeuf and Daniel Clowes. You can see it here:

http://teenlibrarian.co.uk/2014/01/17/plagiarism/

It has been on e of the most popular resources on my site.

Since then there have been a number of other examples featuring people in the public eye that have come to light.

The most recent being Melania Trump being accused of plagiarising Michelle Obama’s speech:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/election-us-2016-36832095

Beyonce has also faced several charges of plagiarism during her career:

http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/beyonce-sued-over-lemonade-trailer-singers-history-plagiarism-complaints-1564560

Azealia Banks has also accused Zayn Malik of plagiarism as well as providing an example of how not to behave on social media, she has since also accused Lady Gaga and Taylor Swift of the same:

https://www.digitalmusicnews.com/2016/07/14/azealia-banks-causes-yet-another-stir-music-industry/

Using people in the public eye is a good way of engaging with students who may otherwise not show much interest in library lessons. I will just say as a word of caution that Azealia Banks has has used racially charged language – particularly against Zayn Malik so it may be worth making sure that any links used will not cause a backlash against the library due to language.

The Mind’s Treasure Chest

A long, long (ish) time ago I was a student librarian in the School of Education at the Cape Technikon (now the Cape Peninsula University of Technology). It was during the second year of my studies that one of my favourite lecturers (Dr Liz van Aswegen) showed my class a video called The Mind’s Treasure Chest

Released in 1991, THE MIND’S TREASURE CHEST is a feature length educational comedy that teaches students to think for themselves. This film is a marriage between a Hollywood movie and an educational video. It’s about libraries, research, and information. It’s about history and hypothesizing. It’s about thinking for yourself.

Distributed in five countries, it won a multitude of awards, including Best Film for Grades 7 – 12 at the National Educational Film and Video Festival.

For Kennedy buffs, the film features a number of sequences that dramatize the history of the Bay of Pigs and the Cuban Missile Crisis.

Parts of it are a bit dated, for example I do not think that many (or any) school libraries still use microfiche readers; catalogues are computerised and the internet is now available on broadband rather than a limited dial up service.

You may be able to show it to your students as part of their library induction or get them to spot the ways that school library usage has changed (and indeed, remained the same) but if not it is still an entertaining and educational film for Librarians to watch and reminisce on how things used to be done.

The Minds Treasure Chest

Library Lessons: What is a Word?

A discussion on words and the Oxford Dictionaries Word of the Year leading into creating emoji book reviews

Book Review Bunting

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Over the past few years of being a school librarian I have been using reading passports/diaries to help students keep track of their reading. These schemes were all relatively successful but did not really work well when it came to encouraging students to pick up books that others had read.

This year I have started an ongoing project to create book review bunting. I have asked every student in years 7,8 & 9 to write a short review on the back of an image of a library book that they have enjoyed and use it to create bunting to decorate the library. The bunting will be hung low enough for students to reach & read what others think about the book, I am hoping that this will encourage them to hunt down and read the book itself.

At the end of the year I am hoping to have introduced as many students as possible to new books via peer review and also decorate the library with bunting that mirrors the collection. It will also be interesting to see what the most popularly reviewed books are.

Library Lessons: Emoji Reviews

I do not know about anyone else but sometimes getting students to write reviews is akin to getting blood from a rock.

No matter how many times I show examples of good reviews or give out review questions to help students write their reviews but from a large percentage of them all I get reviews like:

“I enjoyed this book”

“It is a good book”

“This book is funny it made me laugh”

I know for a percentage of the classes I work with reading is a chore and not something that they really enjoy so this coming year I will be trying something different.

Instead of a written review I will ask them to use emoji to give an outline of what the book is about and what they thought about it. It will force them to actually think about what they have read either a novel, short story or comic book and engage their non-language communication skills as well as their creativity.

For this exercise I will allow them to use their mobile phones in the lesson

For example:


image

 

In the days running up to the lessons I will use emoji posters to recommend books for students to hopefully catch their interest.

Library Lessons: Looking at Genre

This lesson will act as an introduction to Genre for Year 7 students.

Definition:

A particular type or style of literature, art, film or music that you can recognize because of its special features
(from: http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/learner/genre)

Start with a general discussion on genres and look at some examples

Examples of Genre:

  • Action
  • Adventure
  • Crime
  • Drama
  • Family
  • Fantasy
  • Historical Fiction
  • Horror
  • Humour
  • Paranormal
  • Romance
  • Science Fiction
  • Thriller
  • Discuss some of the features of each that make novels fall into that particular genre.

    Questions:

  • Can a book belong to more than one type of genre?
  • Can you think of any books that may belong to a particular genre?
  • Does the cover of a book give any indication as to what genre it could be?
  • Do you have a favourite genre?
  • Do you have a favourite novel if yes what genre does it fall into?
  •  
    Activity:

    Choose a book it can be your favourite book or the book you are currently reading, determine which genre it falls into then design and draw six alternate covers for it as if it was another genre. This can be done in library lesson time and also for homework.