Monthly Archives: June 2017

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Mark Hamill tweeted my Star Wars Poster

I am not normally inclined towards bragging (usually – when awesome things happen I can’t help it) but yesterday the National Library of Scotland tweeted one of my Star Wars posters at Mark Hamill and he retweeted it with a message of support for Libraries.

So of course I have to share them here:

Poster: Nolite te Bastardes Carborundum!

For fans of The Handmaid’s Tale or for anyone who would like to set up a display of feminist novels.

To download an A3 pdf copy of the poster click on the image below.

To download a poster without ‘Bastardes’ click on th eimage below:

handmaid3

Feminist Fiction, Graphic Novels & Non-Fiction (a list in progress)

Novels

  • Speak – Laurie Halse Anderson
  • The Handmaid’s Tale – Margaret Atwood
  • The Making of Mollie – Anna Carey
  • Sorcerer to the Crown – Zen Cho
  • The Hunger Games – Suzanne Collins
  • Beauty Queens – Libba Bray
  • The Lie Tree – Frances Hardinge
  • The Bermudez Triangle – Maureen Johnson
  • A Wrinkle in Time – Madeleine L’Engle
  • Ash – Malinda Lo
  • The Disreputable History of Frankie Landau-Banks – e. Lockheart
  • Dumplin’ – Julie Murphy
  • Only Ever Yours – Louise O’Neill
  • Asking For It – Louise O’Neill
  • Alanna – Tamora Pierce
  • The Ruby in the Smoke – Philip Pullman
  • How I Live Now – Meg Rosoff
  • Stargirl – Jerry Spinelli
  • Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry – Mildred D. Taylor
  • The Hate You Give – Angie Thomas
  • Maresi – Maria Turtschaninoff
  • Code Name Verity – Elizabeth Wein
  • Black Dove, White Raven – Elizabeth Wein
  • Uglies –Scott Westerfeld
  • Blood Red Road – Moira Young
  • The Book Thief – Marcus Zusak
     
    Graphic Novels
     

  • Captain Marvel: Higher, Further, Faster, More – Kelly Sue Deconnick and David Lopez
  • Ghost World – Daniel Clowes
  • Hark! A Vagrant – Kate Beaton
  • Hilda – Luke Pearson
  • Lumberjanes – Shannon Watters, Grace Ellis, Brooke A. Allen and Noelle Stevenson
  • Ms. Marvel – G. Willow Wilson and Adrian Alphona
  • Paper Girls – Brian K. Vaughan and Cliff Chiang
  • Persepolis – Marjane Satrapi
  • Sally Heathcote Suffragette – Mary M. Talbot, Kate Charlesworth and Bryan Talbot
  • Skim – Jillian Tamaki & Mariko Tamaki
  • This One Summer – Jillian Tamaki & Mariko Tamaki
  • The Unbeatable Squirrel Girl – Ryan North and Erica Henderson
     
    Non-Fiction
     

  • Crafting with Feminism – Bonnie Burton
  • Fantastically Great Women Who Changed The World – Kate Pankhurst
  • We Should All Be Feminists – Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
  • Wonder Women 25 Innovators, Inventors, and Trailblazers Who Changed History – Sam Maggs
  •  
    Compiling a list of books on a subject as emotive as Feminism is difficult and often prone to sparking arguments as books are left out or sometimes disagreed upon due to a variety of factors. If you would like to suggest books for inclusion please feel free to do so in the comments section below, disagreements are also welcome!

    How to Raise a Reader

    From the moment you’re expecting your first child, you are bombarded with messages about the importance of reading. For good reason: The benefits of reading at every stage of a child’s development are well documented. Happily, raising a reader is fun, rewarding and relatively easy.

    A guide from The New York Times by Pamela Paul and Maria Russo:

    How to Raise a Reader

    QUIRK BOOKS PRESENTS BOOK POP!

    In honour of its 15 year anniversary, Quirk Books is launching a year-long celebration of books and pop culture, called Book Pop!

    Quirk has not forgotten their many fans in Britain and have launched UK versions of their reading guides! Also on offer are downloadable posters and other resources to celebrate their amazing and quirky books!

    So if you are searching for activities to run with your teen groups or classes in the coming months drop by Quirk Books Book Pop! and see what is on offer!

    Fever: the Deon Meyer Interview


    Hi Deon, welcome to the TeenLibrarian interview and thank you for giving up your time to answer a few questions!

    Before we begin I would just like to say as a SA expat I am a major fan of your work and love seeing South African authors making waves in the international book world!

    Hi Matt

    Thank you very much for the kind comments. Much appreciated!

    Even though it has a laaitie with a gun, Fever is not a novel aimed at the teen or YA market (but the best books are for all ages) and I know that it will appeal to a number of the older kids I work with! Have you ever considered writing a book aimed specifically at a teen audience?

    My basic philosophy is to write the story I am most passionate about ( I usually have a few brewing), and I write for the only reader I know – me. So if such a story comes around and the reader within gets excited, I would certainly try …

    You are a superstar in the crime fiction world – what inspired you to write a post-apocalyptic novel?

    I’m not quite sure about the ‘superstar’ status, and I must admit that I don’t believe in inspiration, but perspiration. You have to work at finding and developing story ideas. FEVER’s origins are in multiple places; non-fiction books on what would really happen in a world without us, all the great post-apocalyptic novels (and a few short stories) I’ve read in my life, my concern for our planet, and my hope that we can transform our South African society into a country of liberty and equality.

    Fever, like your earlier works was originally written in Afrikaans, when your works are translated do you work with the translator or do you just let them get on with the work?

    I work closely with my exceptional translator Laura Seegers. We’ve been working together for almost 15 years, and have a great understanding.

    I am aware that several of your books have been optioned for film and television over the years, if you had the choice what format you prefer for Fever?

    I think FEVER is best suited for a TV series.

    I am about two thirds of the way through Fever (and may have finished it by the time you answer these questions) – it is so outstandingly good! How long did it take for the Fever to burn through you from initial infection to completion?

    Thank you! It took four years from initial concept to final chapter.

    Most authors I know hate the question “what are you working at the moment?” so instead I will ask what are you currently reading?

    I don’t mind telling you that I’m writing a new Bennie Griessel crime thriller. And I’m reading the superlative Ken Follet’s FALL OF GIANTS.

    Can you recommend the works of other South African authors for an international audience?

    Absolutely. In no particular order, and to name but a few, there’s Karin Brynard, Mike Nicol, Margie Orford, Michael Stanley, Angela Makholwa, Andrew Brown, Chris Marnewick, Paul Mendelson, MD de Villiers

    Amnesty International UK: CHILDREN’S BOOKS HIGHLIGHTING GLOBAL REFUGEE CRISIS WIN AMNESTY CILIP HONOURS

    Two books that address the global refugee crisis have won the Amnesty CILIP Honour, an additional commendation attached to the CILIP Carnegie and Kate Greenaway Medals for outstanding children’s writing and illustration.

    Zana Fraillon’s powerful ‘The Bone Sparrow’ – which highlights the plight of Burma’s Rohingya people and life inside a detention centre in Australia – has won the Honour in the CILIP Carnegie Medal category.

    And Francesca Sanna’s ‘The Journey’ – which tells the story of a family forced to flee their home because of war – has won the Honour in the CILIP Kate Greenaway category.

    Both books tell the stories of families displaced from their homes and detail their struggles with their new lives in a troubled and fractured world.

    Today also marks the start of Refugee Week in the UK, which encourages people in communities across the country to celebrate the contribution that refugees make to life in the UK.

    Zana Fraillon said:

    “I wrote ‘The Bone Sparrow’ so we wouldn’t forget the people and the stories behind the statistics and asylum seeker policies. I wrote it so that we would listen to, and really hear, all those silenced voices. This is something that Amnesty International does every single day. They hear the voices of those who have been silenced and they listen. I am so very proud to have been given this honour, and to have my book recognised by such an inspiring organisation.”

    Francesca Sanna said:

    “I think that books are a powerful tool to raise awareness for human rights, to encourage empathy for those stories that feel very different and far away from our reality. Stories take us to unexpected places, they make us feel what it might be like to walk in somebody else’s shoes. Amnesty International stands for justice, equality and respect for human rights, and knowing that ‘The Journey’ has been awarded makes me feel particularly overwhelmed and honoured.”

    The Amnesty Honour commendations are awarded to the two books on the CILIP Carnegie and Kate Greenaway shortlists that best illuminate, uphold and celebrate human rights.

    Kate Allen, Director of Amnesty UK, said:

    “These books are vital at a time when we are facing a global human rights crisis on an unimaginable scale, highlighting the realities faced by millions living as refugees. The power of children’s literature to shine a light humanely can have a lasting and significant impact on young readers and help develop compassion for those affected. I’d like to offer my congratulations to both authors from all at Amnesty for their moving and inspirational work in raising vital human rights issues.”

    Bali Rai, author and one of the Honour judges in the Carnegie category, said of ‘The Bone Sparrow’:

    “The book makes you cry, it makes you think, it makes you angry. It has great potential for doing good in promoting and illuminating human rights. It’s an important story in bringing to the fore issues we’re not aware of, such as detention camps and the treatment of the Rohingya people.”

    Ross Collins, Honour judge and winner of last year’s first Amnesty CILIP Honour for his book ‘There’s A Bear on My Chair’, said of ‘The Journey’:

    “What Francesca Sanna has achieved with ‘The Journey’ is really quite extraordinary. Francesca brings light, colour and style to the most difficult of imagery, and shows us the family’s plight with warmth and subtlety. Ultimately it is a tale of hope over adversity which will not only open new doors for young readers, but enchant them with its beauty.”

    The Amnesty CILIP Honour is the result of a major human rights partnership between Amnesty and CILIP, the libraries and information association. The Amnesty CILIP Honour is supported using public funding by Arts Council England.

    The winners of the 2017 medals were Ruta Sepetys with ‘Salt to the Sea’ (CILIP Carnegie Medal) and Lane Smith with ‘There is A Tribe of Kids’ (CILIP Kate Greenaway Medal). The winners were announced today at a gala event in London’s Royal Institute of British Architects.

    Amnesty International is the world’s leading human rights organisation with more than seven million supporters worldwide

     

    About the CILIP Carnegie Medal

    The Carnegie Medal, awarded annually to the writer of an outstanding book for children, was established in 1936 in memory of the Scottish-born philanthropist, Andrew Carnegie (1835-1919). A self-made industrialist who made his fortune in steel in the USA, Carnegie’s experience of using a library as a child led him to resolve that “If ever wealth came to me that it should be used to establish free libraries.” He set up more than 2,800 libraries across the English-speaking world and by the time of his death over half the library authorities in Great Britain had Carnegie libraries.

    About the CILIP Kate Greenaway Medal

    The Kate Greenaway Medal was established in 1955 for distinguished illustration in a book for children. Named after the popular nineteenth century artist, known for her beautiful children’s illustrations and designs, the CILIP Kate Greenaway Medal is awarded annually for an outstanding book in terms of illustration for children and young people.

    The CILIP Carnegie and Kate Greenaway Children’s Book Awards


     

    #YATakeover Neil Gaiman Interview

    Early last week I received a cryptic e- mail from Jake Hope asking if I was free on Saturday from 4 – 5pm. I said of course and he revealed that Neil Gaiman had agreed to participate Anthe FAFictionado’s #YATakeover and they wanted me to host the chat.

    Once I had managed to stop dancing round the library I agreed and then started fretting that something terrible would happen (spoiler: it didn’t)

    The interview took place yesterday on twitter and the storify is below:

    #TeenLibrarianMonthly June 2017

    Download (PDF, Unknown)

    My Name is Not Refugee by Kate Milner

    Our town is not safe for us any more.
    Leaving will be sad, but quite exciting too.
    The journey will be long, but Mum will be there every step of the way.
    How would you feel if you had to leave your home behind?

    My Name is Not Refugee is an interactive picture book told from the perspective of a young boy that has become a refugee with his mother. This is perfect for introducing why people become refugees to children of all ages, it asks the reader to consider what they would do if they became a refugee and is perfect for sparking group and individual conversations. This book is not just for onlookers it has been designed with young refugees in mind and reinforces that while they may be refugees – they should not let this define who they are.

    Kate Milner has created a book that is both heartbreaking and hopeful; in this current climate of multiple global crises it is an essential book for all libraries and collections.

    My Name is Not Refugee written by Kate Milner and published by The Bucket List imprint of Barrington Stoke is out now.