Category Archives: Book Lists

CILIP Carnegie and Kate Greenaway Awards 2019

It is finally here! The biggest ever (again) nominations list for the best ever children’s books awards.

For those of you who don’t know, the Carnegie medal is awarded to the author of an outstanding piece of literature for children and young people while the Kate Greenaway medal recognises the illustrator of an outstandingly illustrated book for children and young people (the 2019 awards are for titles published in the UK between September 2017 and August 2018). Most nominations come from members of CILIP and so for a book to be nominated it must have been read and loved by at least one individual…hopefully, before nominating, that individual will have also considered whether the book meets the criteria that the judges then use to whittle the huge nominations list down to a long list of (up to) 20 each to a shortlist of (up to) 8 each to the eventual winners. Some of us (lucky us) get sent books by publishers, sometimes with a “we’d like this to be considered for CKG” note, but the nominations are all made by people with an interest in libraries for children and young people.

This summer a report was published into the diversity review (Matt blogged about it here) bringing a few changes to the process to ensure that it is as diverse and inclusive as possible:

This year, 254 books have been nominated for the 2019 Medals; 137 books are in the running for the CILIP Carnegie Medal and 117 for the Kate Greenaway Medal. Books have been put forward by a record number of nominators which, alongside CILIP members, includes several external bodies − BookTrust, CLPE, Commonword, IBBY, Inclusive Minds, National Literacy Trust and RNIB − invited to nominate as part of CILIP’s diversity and inclusion action plan for the Awards.

As part of this action plan, this year also sees:

o   an expanded judging panel of librarians, bringing a broad range of lived experiences and perspectives

o   enhanced diversity training for the judges

o   an equality, diversity and inclusion advisory panel to support and advise on the Awards process

o   a new prize voted for by children and young people

o   and a quarterly publication of Top 10 New Voices eligible for the upcoming Medals.

Scanning the lists, some favourites are there along with a few that I keep meaning to read. In the years before my judging tenure I read the full nominations list every year, and then obviously while judging I read everything (some things many times over), but as the list grows ever longer and more and more books continue to be published that will be eligible for 2020 (…2020! Wishing my life away in CKGs…) this year I’m going to alternate one book from the list with one new book and see how far I get. So far, I’ve only read 1/3 of the Carnegies (clearly spent too much time re-reading Pratchett) and nearly half the Kate Greenaways (will have to raid the public library for the rest).

What do I love that I’ve read so far? Oooh, it is fab to be able to think about favourites and not just about criteria. Every year I guarantee you every one of the judges will have to lose at least one of their favourites to those that the panel agree best meet the criteria. Judges can’t say “I loved this book because…”, they have to say “it meets this criteria because…”.

  • So my top 10 Carnegie favourites so far are: David Almond Colour of the Sun, Jo Cotterill Jelly, S.E. Durrant Running on Empty, Candy Gourlay Bone Talk, Frances Hardinge A Skinful of Shadows, Catherine Johnson Freedom, Zanib Mian The Muslims, Philip Reeve Station Zero, Jason Reynolds Long Way Down, Dave Shelton The Book Case.
  • Top 10 Kate Greenaway that I love, so far, are: Mehrdokht Amini Nimesh the Adventurer, Francesca Chessa Is it a Mermaid?, Rebecca Cobb The Day War Came, Ruth Hearson Zeki Gets a Checkup, Jean Jullien I Want to be in a Scary Story, Fiona Lumbers Luna Loves Library Day, Poonam Mistry You’re Safe With Me, Jackie Morris The Lost Words, Chris Priestly Long Way Down, Catell Ronca The Drum.

It was hard to whittle it down to 10 each and I’ve got so many left to read! I’m certain they won’t all be longlisted, but that’s the joy of picking favourites. It seems to me that the Kate Greenaway list has far fewer titles for older children than in the last few years, but of course that may well just be because half the ones I’ve not read yet are for teenagers and (having a 3 year old) I’ve gravitated more towards classic picture books! The Carnegie list seems to have something for everyone in there, I don’t envy the judges having to make those decisions*!

(*who am I kidding, of course I do, those judging meetings are intense but absolutely brilliant)

LGBTQ+ Books: a List

A selection of picture books, fiction, non-fiction and graphic novels featuring LGBTQ+ characters in either main or supporting roles.

Usual caveats apply: there are many more titles available, but these are books that I have in my library collection and I do recommend them. If anyone would like to recommend additional titles, then please leave a comment below.

Picture Books

  • Pride the story of Harvey Milk and the Rainbow Flag by Rob Sanders & Steven Salerno
  • A Day in the Life of Marlon Bundo by Jill twiss & E.G. Keller
  • And Tango Makes Three by Justin Richardson, Peter Parnell & Henry Cole
  • The Great Big Book of Families by Mary Hoffman and Ros Asquith
  • Introducing Teddy by Jessica Walton and Dougal MacPherson
  •  
    Fiction

  • The Poet X by Elizabeth Acevedo

  • Simon vs the Homo Sapiens Agenda
  • The Upside of Unrequited by Becky Albertalli
  • Six of Crows by Leigh Bardugo
  • Kaleidoscope Song by Fox Benwell
  • Alex as Well by Alyssa Brugman
  • The Perks of being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky
  • Undone by Cat Clarke
  • The Miseducation of Cameron Post Emily M. Danforth
  • Wildthorn by Jane Eagland
  • If You Could be Mine by Sara Farizan
  • Tessa Masterton Will Go to Prom by Emily Franklin & Brendan Halpin
  • Will Grayson, Will Grayson by John Green & David Levithan
  • Noah Can’t Even by Simon James Green
  • Skylarks by Karen Gregory
  • Read Me Like a Book by Liz Kessler
  • Pantomime by Laura Lam
  • Boy Meets Boy
  • Two Boys Kissing by David Levithan

  • A Line in the Dark
  • Ash
  • Huntress by Malinda Lo
  • The Gentleman’s Guide to Vice and Virtue by Lee Mackenzie
  • The Big Lie by Julie Mayhew
  • The Rest of Us Just Live Here
  • Release by Patrick Ness
  • Things a Bright Girl can Do by Sally Nicholls
  • Gabi, a Girl in Pieces by Isabel Quintero
  • Fever Crumb by Philip Reeve
  • Carry On by Rainbow Rowell
  • If I Was Your Girl by Meredith Russo
  • Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe by Benjamin Alire Sáenz
  • Grasshopper Jungle by Andrew Smith
  • Lies We Tell Ourselves by Robin Talley
  • The Color Purple by Alice Walker
  • The Art of Being Normal by Lisa Williamson
  • Queens of Geek by Jen Wilde
  • Playing the Oart by Daria Wilke translated by Marian Schwarz
     
    Graphic Novels
     

  • Giant Days by John Allison
  • Fun Home by Alison Bechdel
  • The Authority by Warren Ellis & Bryan Hitch
  • Death: The High Cost of Living
  • Death: The Time of Your Life by Neil Gaiman & Chris Bachalo
  • The Wicked + The Divine
  • Young Avengers by Kieran Gillen & Jamie McKelvie
  • Scott Pilgrim by Bryan Lee O’Malley
  • The Imitation Game: Alan Turing Decoded by Jim Ottaviani & Leland Purvis
  • Batwoman: Elegy by Greg Rucka & J.H. Williams III
  • Lumberjanes by Noelle Stevenson, Grace Ellis, Brooklyn Allen & Shannon Watters
  • Skim by Mariko Tamaki & Jillian Tamaki
  • Supergirl: Being Super by Mariko Tamaki & Joëlle Jones
  • Drama by Raina Telgemeier
  • Pedro and Me by Judd Winick
  •  
    Non-Fiction

  • Issues: Sexuality and Gender edited by Cara Acred
  • How to Transform your School into an LGBTQ+ Friendly Place: a Practical Guide for Nursery, Primary and Secondary Teachers by Dr Elly Barnes MBE and Dr Anna Carlile
  • Queer : the ultimate LGBT guide for teens by Kathy Belge
  • This Book is Gay
  • The Gender Games by Juno Dawson
  • From Ace to Ze: The Little Book of LGBT Terms by Harriet Dyer
  • LGBTQ Comedic Monologues That are Actually Funny by Alisha Gaddis
  • Understanding Sexuality: what it means to be Lesbian, Gay or Bisexual
  • Understanding Transgender by Honor Head
  • GLBTQ: the Survival Guide for Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender and Questioning Teens by Kenny Huegel
  • From Prejudice to Pride: a History of the LGBTQ+ Movement by Amy Lamé
  • Identity and Gender by Charlie Ogden
  • Straight talk About… Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity by Rachel Stuckey
  • Book List: Novels with Antifascist/nazi Themes

  • Number the Stars – Lois Lowry
  • The Devil’s Arithmetic – Jane Yolen
  • Tarzan & the Blackshirts – Andy Croft
  • A is for Activist – Innosanta Nagara
  • Who are Refugees and Migrants? – Michael Rosen
  • Girl with a White Dog – Anne Booth
  • Hitler’s Canary – Sandi Toksvig
  • Tender Earth – Sita Bramichari
  • Maggot Moon – Sally Gardner
  • Noughts and Crosses – Malory Blackman
  • The Big Lie – Julie Mayhew
  • The Tripods – John Christopher
  • Code Name Verity – Elizabeth Wein
  • When Hitler Stole the Pink Rabbit – Judith Kerr
  • The Silver Sword – Ian Serrailier
  • I Am David – Ann Holm
  • The Wave – Todd Strasser
  • A Wrinkle in time – Madeleine L’Engle
  • The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas – John Boyne
  • The Boy at the Top of the Mountain – John Boyne
  • Street of Tall People – Alan Gibbons
  • Trouble at Cable Street – Joan Lingard
  • A World between Us – Lydia Syson
  • The Book Thief – Marcus Zusak
  • My Friend the Enemy – Dan Smith
  • Max – Sarah Cohen-Scali

    For Older Readers

  • The Handmaid’s Tale – Margaret Atwood
  • It Can’t happen Here – Sinclair Lewis
  • 1984 – George Orwell
  • Animal Farm – George Orwell
  • Brave New World – Aldous Huxley
  • Fahrenheit 451 – Ray Bradbury
  • Slaughterhouse Five – Kurt Vonnegut
  • Night – Elie Wiesel
  • Amnesty International UK has compiled a list of recommended books for young readers to enjoy this summer

    Amnesty’s top picks explore and celebrate human rights – including themes of family life, justice, racism and the refugee crisis – and have been selected for three age ranges: younger readers (3-7 years); junior readers (8-12 years); and teens (13-16 years).

    Nicky Parker, Publisher at Amnesty UK, said:

    At Amnesty, we believe that reading fiction can help develop our empathy and understanding of social justice. There’s nothing better than a powerful story to make us think about what it might be like to be someone else.

    Our lists of top summer reads have been carefully selected to help nurture young readers’ sense of individual freedom and self-expression. We hope these books will inspire children to take pride in the ways they are different and special, and help give them the confidence to stand up for themselves and others.

    For more information about Amnesty Books and the lists below, see here.

    Amnesty’s top books for younger readers: 3-7yrs

    Silver Buttons, by Bob Graham,celebrates diversity and tells the story of a young girl, Jodie, who is busy drawing a duck wearing boots with silver buttons.

    Welcome, by Barroux,tells the story of three polar bears that are set adrift in the ocean after part of their ice float suddenly breaks off. It explores themes of difference, belonging and climate change, and has powerful echoes with the current refugee crisis.

    Vanilla Ice Cream, by Bob Graham, celebrates the interconnectedness of our world through the journey of a young sparrow from an Indian rice-paddy to a city in the North.

    There’s a Bear on My Chair, by Ross Collins,which was awarded the Amnesty CILIP Honour 2016, is a witty portrayal of activism and peaceful protest, told through the story of a tiny mouse attempting to move a bear from his favourite chair.

    No!, by David McPhail, tells the tale of a young boy in a war-torn country, who sets off to post a letter and witnesses an act of cruelty on his way. It highlights how everybody – even young children – is capable of taking a stand against oppression.

    Luna Loves Library Day, by Joseph Coelho and illustrated by Fiona Lumbers,shows the power reading can have in bringing families together.

    Swimmy, by Leo Lionni,brings to lifean underwater world in a wonderful story about togetherness.

    Oliver, by Birgitta Sif, is a celebration of difference and an exploration of how true friendship springs from self-acceptance.

    My Little Book of Big Freedoms, by Chris Riddell, helps readers understand why human rights are so important for leading a free, safe and happy life.

    What Are You Playing At?, by Marie-Sabine Roger and Anne Sol, is a ‘lift-the-flap’ book that aims to challenge rigid gender norms around childhood play.

    So Much!, by Trish Cooke and illustrated by Helen Oxenbury, is a warm and humorous portrayal of family life.

    Odd Dog Out, by Rob Biddulph,is a story of a lonely dog who packs her bags for Doggywood, where she feels she belongs. Itemphasises the importance of individuality and the freedom to live as one chooses.

    Handa’s Surprise, by Eileen Browne,is a storyabout sharing and friendship, in which a series of wild animals find Handa’s picnic basket far too tempting.

    Footpath Flowers, by JonArno Lawson and illustrated by Sydney Smith, is a wordless picture book about a young girl who gathers wild flowers and transforms people’s lives when she gives them away.

    How To Look After Your Dinosaur, by Jason Cockcroft, is a humorous guide for prospective dinosaur-owners and a story about friendship.

    I Have the Right to Be a Child, by Alain Serres and illustrated by Aurélia Fronty,uses pictures to bring the Convention on the Rights of the Child to life and help young readers understand their rights.

    Amnesty’s top books for junior readers: 8-12 years

    Dreams of Freedom, is Amnesty’s latest book, which combines the words of human rights heroes such as Nelson Mandela, Anne Frank and Malala Yousafzai, with beautiful illustrations from renowned international artists including Oliver Jeffers and Chris Riddell.

    Peter in Peril, by Helen Bate, is a graphic novel based on a true story about a boy named Peter who is Jewish and living in 1940s Hungary.

    Two Weeks with the Queen, by Morris Gleitzman, follows Colin, a young boy who has a plan to break into Buckingham Palace. It is a witty and empathetic book that deals with some difficult themes, such as bereavement and homophobia.

    The Bone Sparrow, by Zana Fraillon,winner of theAmnesty CILIP Honour 2017,highlights the plight of Burma’s Rohingya people and details life inside a detention centre in Australia.

    Tender Earth, by Sita Brahmachari,is about 11-year-old Laila Levenson who feels daunted by the prospect of secondary school but begins to find her own voice after discoveringNana Josie’s protest book.

    Sputnik’s Guide to Life on Earth, by Frank Cottrell Boyce,follows Sputnik and Prez on a series of unbelievable mishaps, scrapes and adventures, and celebrates the importance of finding a home in a very big universe.

    The Hypnotist, by Laurence Anholt,tells the tale of 13-year-old Pip who has to battle racial hatred when he goes to work as a farmhand. Set during the civil rights struggles of 1960s America,The Hypnotist explores the nature of prejudice and racist violence in a thoughtful and original way.

    The Journey, by Francesca Sanna, explores the theme of migration through a child’s eyes as a mother and her two young children are forced to flee their country.

    The Girl of Ink and Stars, by Kiran Millwood Hargrave, is a captivating story about Isabella, the daughter of a cartographer, who is the only person with the skills to find her best friend Lupe when she goes missing.

    A Story Like The Wind, by Jill Lewis and illustrated by Jo Weaver, tells intertwined stories about loneliness, the need for shelter, and how music can provide solace for those who are struggling.

    Amnesty’s top books for teens: 13-16 years

    Max, by Sarah Cohen-Scali, is about Max, a boy born into the Nazi Lebensborn programme designed to engineer ‘perfect’ Aryan children, who comes to question the world view he has been fed growing up.

    Here I Stand: Stories that Speak for Freedom, is a compelling collection of stories, poems and graphic narratives put together by Amnesty which explore different aspects of our human rights.

    The Art of Being Normal, by Lisa Williamson, is a powerful portrayal of two young people struggling to assert their identity in an often hostile and unforgiving world

    Lies We Tell Ourselves, by Robin Talley, is a coming-of-age novel about two brave young women who confront racism and homophobia to live as they choose.

    The Stars at Oktober Bend, by Glenda Millard, is narrated by 15-year-old Alice Nightingale who has suffered a brain injury and struggles to express herself. It explores themes of sexual assault, poverty and racism.

    The Hate U Give, by Angie Thomas, is inspired by the ‘Black Lives Matter’ movement and follows 16-year-old Starr, whose life changes forever when she witnesses a policeman murder her childhood friend, Khalil.

    Orangeboy, by Patrice Lawrence, is a fast-paced thriller that gives an original and fresh perspective on the struggles facing London’s teenagers and the pressures that surround gang culture.

    Salt to the Sea, by Ruta Sepetys,follows a host of characters in Germany 1945 as they seek shelter from the Red Army aboard theWilhelm Gustlof. This is a tragic story that has rarely been told.

    Alpha, by Bessora and Barroux, is a graphic novel that follows the story of a father who leaves Ivory Coast in the hope of reaching Paris to be reunited with his wife and child.

    Straight Outta Crongton, by Alex Wheatle, follows 15-year-old Mo growing up in the tough, crime-ridden neighbourhood of South Crong.

    Sex & Sexuality: 11 Books for Teens

    There are few things more squirm-inducing for teenagers (and adults) than sitting down for a discussion on what is going on with their bodies and why they are having certain feelings, I have sat through PSHE and well-being lessons that have resembled Dante’s Inferno with damned souls writhing in what seems to be (for them) an eternity of torment.

    Having worked in libraries for ages I have come to learn that sometimes it is preferable (for young people anyway) to have a decent collection of books on puberty, sex and sexuality that they can borrow unofficially and return later in secret.

    The books below are nine of the most popular books on this subject that I have in my collection (inasmuch they disappear with great frequency) and two recently published books that I think will be as popular.

    The Girl Files All about Puberty and Growing Up– Jacqui Bailey
    The Girl Files
    This is Not a Sex Book – Chusita & Maria Llovet
    this is not a sex book
    This Book is Gay – Juno Dawson
    this book is gay
    Being a Boy – Juno Dawson illus. Spike Gerrel
    being a boy
    The Gender Games – Juno Dawson
    the gender games
    Being a Girl – Hayley Long, illustrated by Gemma Correll
    being a girl
    The Boy Files: Puberty, Growing Up and All That Stuff – Alex Hooper-Hodgson
    the boy files
    Sex, Snogs, Dates and Mates – Anita Naik
    sex snogs dates
    How to Be a Girl the common Sense Guide to Girlhood – Anita Naik
    how to be a girl
    Periods, Zits and Other Bits – Charlotte Owen
    periods-zits-and-other-bits
    Doing It: Let’s Talk About Sex… – Hannah Witton
    doing it

    As with all book lists this is not meant to be exhaustive, if colleagues reading this have other books they would like to suggest please do so in the comments below.

    Feminist Fiction, Graphic Novels & Non-Fiction (a list in progress)

    Novels

  • Speak – Laurie Halse Anderson
  • The Handmaid’s Tale – Margaret Atwood
  • The Making of Mollie – Anna Carey
  • Sorcerer to the Crown – Zen Cho
  • The Hunger Games – Suzanne Collins
  • Beauty Queens – Libba Bray
  • The Lie Tree – Frances Hardinge
  • The Bermudez Triangle – Maureen Johnson
  • A Wrinkle in Time – Madeleine L’Engle
  • Ash – Malinda Lo
  • The Disreputable History of Frankie Landau-Banks – e. Lockheart
  • Dumplin’ – Julie Murphy
  • Only Ever Yours – Louise O’Neill
  • Asking For It – Louise O’Neill
  • Alanna – Tamora Pierce
  • The Ruby in the Smoke – Philip Pullman
  • How I Live Now – Meg Rosoff
  • Stargirl – Jerry Spinelli
  • Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry – Mildred D. Taylor
  • The Hate You Give – Angie Thomas
  • Maresi – Maria Turtschaninoff
  • Code Name Verity – Elizabeth Wein
  • Black Dove, White Raven – Elizabeth Wein
  • Uglies –Scott Westerfeld
  • Blood Red Road – Moira Young
  • The Book Thief – Marcus Zusak
     
    Graphic Novels
     

  • Captain Marvel: Higher, Further, Faster, More – Kelly Sue Deconnick and David Lopez
  • Ghost World – Daniel Clowes
  • Hark! A Vagrant – Kate Beaton
  • Hilda – Luke Pearson
  • Lumberjanes – Shannon Watters, Grace Ellis, Brooke A. Allen and Noelle Stevenson
  • Ms. Marvel – G. Willow Wilson and Adrian Alphona
  • Paper Girls – Brian K. Vaughan and Cliff Chiang
  • Persepolis – Marjane Satrapi
  • Sally Heathcote Suffragette – Mary M. Talbot, Kate Charlesworth and Bryan Talbot
  • Skim – Jillian Tamaki & Mariko Tamaki
  • This One Summer – Jillian Tamaki & Mariko Tamaki
  • The Unbeatable Squirrel Girl – Ryan North and Erica Henderson
     
    Non-Fiction
     

  • Crafting with Feminism – Bonnie Burton
  • Fantastically Great Women Who Changed The World – Kate Pankhurst
  • We Should All Be Feminists – Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
  • Wonder Women 25 Innovators, Inventors, and Trailblazers Who Changed History – Sam Maggs
  •  
    Compiling a list of books on a subject as emotive as Feminism is difficult and often prone to sparking arguments as books are left out or sometimes disagreed upon due to a variety of factors. If you would like to suggest books for inclusion please feel free to do so in the comments section below, disagreements are also welcome!

    Refugees, Immigrants & Asylum-Seekers: a short list

    This list is a companion to http://teenlibrarian.co.uk/2015/11/20/book-list-refugees/

    As we become immersed in the 2016 Christmas it is important to remember that the reason for the season was a refugee for a large part of his early life, not only that he was the son of a single mother from Palestine.

    We are exhorted to welcome him into our hearts, what do you think the chances are of he and his family being welcomed to seek sanctuary in the UK in this day and age?

    I have put together a short list of books about refugees, immigrants and asylum-seekers for readers of all ages below.

    refuge-booth
    Refuge by Anne Booth and Sam Usher, it is the Christmas story seen through the eyes of the Donkey, simply told with beautiful illustrations it is a timeless work that could be the story of a refugee family today.

    Refuge is published by Nosy Crow

    Alpha SOFTCOVER 13mm.indd
    Alpha: Abidjan to Gare du Nord by Bessora and Barroux, translated by Sarah Ardizzone is a heart-breaking, award-winning graphic novel detailing the journey Alpha takes from his village in Cote d’Ivoire to Europe. With a visa this would only take a few hours but for refugees it is a dangerous, life-threatening journey of many months.

    Alpha is published by Barrington Stoke
    sun-star-yoon
    The Sun is Also a Star by Nicola Yoon a love set in New York City, between Daniel a Korean-American and Natasha the daughter of illegal immigrants from Jamaica and the 12 hours they spend together before her family is deported.

    The Sun is Also a Star is published by Penguin

    arrival-tan
    The Arrival by Shaun Tan is a wordless graphic novel detailing the arrival of a migrant in a strange, foreign land. The Arrival is a masterclass of wordless storytelling, showing through imagery the difficulty migrants often face when arriving in an alien culture.

    The Arrival is published by Hodder Children’s Books

    falling-star
    Every Falling Star by Sungju Lee and Susan McClelland is the chilling memoir of Sungju Lee’s life as a street child and later his escape from North Korea to a new life in Canada.

    Every Falling Star is published by Amulet Books

    journey-sanna
    The Journey by Francesca Sanna is a picture book that has an effect like an unexpected punch to the stomach. After the death of her husband in a civil war, a woman takes her two children on a journey towards safety. I have never read a picture book that affected me so deeply, perfect for discussing war and refugees with readers of all ages.

    The Journey is published by Flying Eye Books

    A List of Books for Safer Internet Day

    A list of books to suggest to students when discussing online safety and Internet use.

    Chicken Clicking – Jean Willis & Tony Ross
    Dark Poppy’s Demise – S.A. Partridge
    Defriended – Ruth Baron
    Exposed – Susan Vaught
    Followers – Anna Davies
    Identity Theft – Anna Davies
    Little Brother – Cory Doctorow
    Ready Player One – Ernest Cline
    Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda – Becky Albertali
    Want To go Private? – Sarah Darer Littman
    Web of Darkness – Bali Rai

    Book List: Refugees

    A selection of books about refugees from around the world for young readers

  • The Arrival by Shaun Tan
  • The Breadwinner
    Mud City
    Parvana’s Journey
    My Name is Parvana by Deborah Ellis
  • Looking at the Stars by Jo Cotterill
  • Close to the Wind by Jon Walter
  • Kiss the Dust by Elizabeth Laird
  • Little Soldier by Bernard Ashley
  • Mahtab’s Story by Libby Gleeson
  • The Other Side of Truth by Beverley Naidoo
  • Refugee Boy by Benjamin Zephaniah
  • Boy Overboard
    Girl Underground by Morris Gleitzman
  • Home is a Place Called Nowhere by Leon Rosselson
  • A Long Walk to Water by Linda Sue Park
  • Bamboo People by Mitali Perkins
  • Now Is The Time For Running by Michael Williams
  • Out of Nowhere by Maria Padian
  • Where I Belong by Gillian Cross
  • Shadow by Michael Morpurgo
  • A Hare in the Elephant’s Trunk by Jan Coates
  • The Milk of Birds by Sylvia Whitman
  • Refuge by Anne Booth & Samuel Usher
  • The Unforgotten Coat by Frank Cottrell Boyce
  • Azzi in Between by Sarah Garland
  • The Colour of Home by Mary Hoffman and Karin Littlewood
  • See also: The Letterbox Library list of books about refugees & migration
    http://www.letterboxlibrary.com/acatalog/Refugees_and_Migration.html

    Book List: Child Soldiers

    child soldiers header
    A list of novels, comics and non-fiction about children and teenagers that through necessity, trickery or coercion become soldiers

    Alex Rider series by Anthony Horowitz
    A Long Way Gone – Ishmael Beah
    Attack on Titan (manga) – Hajime Isayama
    Boy Soldier – Andy McNab
    Buffalo Soldier – Tanya Landman
    Charley’s War (graphic novel) – Pat Mills & drawn by Joe Colquhoun
    CHERUB series – Robert Muchamore
    Child Soldier – Jessica Dee Humphreys & Claudia Davila
    Chronicles of Narnia – C.S. Lewis
    Code Name Verity – Elizabeth Wein
    Ender’s Game – Orson Scott Card
    Fullmetal Alchemist (manga) – Hiromu Arakawa
    Harry Potter series – J.K. Rowling
    How I Live Now – Meg Rosoff
    Leviathan trilogy – Scott Westerfeld
    Little Soldier – Bernard Ashley
    Percy Jackson series – Rick Riordan
    Refugee Boy – Benjamin Zephaniah
    Rose Under Fire – Elizabeth Wein
    The Hero and the Crown & The Blue Sword – Robin McKinley
    The Hunger Games – Suzanne Collins
    Tomorrow When the War Began – John Marsden
    Warchild – Emmanuel Jal