Category Archives: Book Lists

Book List: Novels with Antifascist/nazi Themes

  • Number the Stars – Lois Lowry
  • The Devil’s Arithmetic – Jane Yolen
  • Tarzan & the Blackshirts – Andy Croft
  • A is for Activist – Innosanta Nagara
  • Who are Refugees and Migrants? – Michael Rosen
  • Girl with a White Dog – Anne Booth
  • Hitler’s Canary – Sandi Toksvig
  • Tender Earth – Sita Bramichari
  • Maggot Moon – Sally Gardner
  • Noughts and Crosses – Malory Blackman
  • The Big Lie – Julie Mayhew
  • The Tripods – John Christopher
  • Code Name Verity – Elizabeth Wein
  • When Hitler Stole the Pink Rabbit – Judith Kerr
  • The Silver Sword – Ian Serrailier
  • I Am David – Ann Holm
  • The Wave – Todd Strasser
  • A Wrinkle in time – Madeleine L’Engle
  • The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas – John Boyne
  • The Boy at the Top of the Mountain – John Boyne
  • Street of Tall People – Alan Gibbons
  • Trouble at Cable Street – Joan Lingard
  • A World between Us – Lydia Syson
  • The Book Thief – Marcus Zusak
  • My Friend the Enemy – Dan Smith
  • Max – Sarah Cohen-Scali

    For Older Readers

  • The Handmaid’s Tale – Margaret Atwood
  • It Can’t happen Here – Sinclair Lewis
  • 1984 – George Orwell
  • Animal Farm – George Orwell
  • Brave New World – Aldous Huxley
  • Fahrenheit 451 – Ray Bradbury
  • Slaughterhouse Five – Kurt Vonnegut
  • Night – Elie Wiesel
  • Amnesty International UK has compiled a list of recommended books for young readers to enjoy this summer

    Amnesty’s top picks explore and celebrate human rights – including themes of family life, justice, racism and the refugee crisis – and have been selected for three age ranges: younger readers (3-7 years); junior readers (8-12 years); and teens (13-16 years).

    Nicky Parker, Publisher at Amnesty UK, said:

    At Amnesty, we believe that reading fiction can help develop our empathy and understanding of social justice. There’s nothing better than a powerful story to make us think about what it might be like to be someone else.

    Our lists of top summer reads have been carefully selected to help nurture young readers’ sense of individual freedom and self-expression. We hope these books will inspire children to take pride in the ways they are different and special, and help give them the confidence to stand up for themselves and others.

    For more information about Amnesty Books and the lists below, see here.

    Amnesty’s top books for younger readers: 3-7yrs

    Silver Buttons, by Bob Graham,celebrates diversity and tells the story of a young girl, Jodie, who is busy drawing a duck wearing boots with silver buttons.

    Welcome, by Barroux,tells the story of three polar bears that are set adrift in the ocean after part of their ice float suddenly breaks off. It explores themes of difference, belonging and climate change, and has powerful echoes with the current refugee crisis.

    Vanilla Ice Cream, by Bob Graham, celebrates the interconnectedness of our world through the journey of a young sparrow from an Indian rice-paddy to a city in the North.

    There’s a Bear on My Chair, by Ross Collins,which was awarded the Amnesty CILIP Honour 2016, is a witty portrayal of activism and peaceful protest, told through the story of a tiny mouse attempting to move a bear from his favourite chair.

    No!, by David McPhail, tells the tale of a young boy in a war-torn country, who sets off to post a letter and witnesses an act of cruelty on his way. It highlights how everybody – even young children – is capable of taking a stand against oppression.

    Luna Loves Library Day, by Joseph Coelho and illustrated by Fiona Lumbers,shows the power reading can have in bringing families together.

    Swimmy, by Leo Lionni,brings to lifean underwater world in a wonderful story about togetherness.

    Oliver, by Birgitta Sif, is a celebration of difference and an exploration of how true friendship springs from self-acceptance.

    My Little Book of Big Freedoms, by Chris Riddell, helps readers understand why human rights are so important for leading a free, safe and happy life.

    What Are You Playing At?, by Marie-Sabine Roger and Anne Sol, is a ‘lift-the-flap’ book that aims to challenge rigid gender norms around childhood play.

    So Much!, by Trish Cooke and illustrated by Helen Oxenbury, is a warm and humorous portrayal of family life.

    Odd Dog Out, by Rob Biddulph,is a story of a lonely dog who packs her bags for Doggywood, where she feels she belongs. Itemphasises the importance of individuality and the freedom to live as one chooses.

    Handa’s Surprise, by Eileen Browne,is a storyabout sharing and friendship, in which a series of wild animals find Handa’s picnic basket far too tempting.

    Footpath Flowers, by JonArno Lawson and illustrated by Sydney Smith, is a wordless picture book about a young girl who gathers wild flowers and transforms people’s lives when she gives them away.

    How To Look After Your Dinosaur, by Jason Cockcroft, is a humorous guide for prospective dinosaur-owners and a story about friendship.

    I Have the Right to Be a Child, by Alain Serres and illustrated by Aurélia Fronty,uses pictures to bring the Convention on the Rights of the Child to life and help young readers understand their rights.

    Amnesty’s top books for junior readers: 8-12 years

    Dreams of Freedom, is Amnesty’s latest book, which combines the words of human rights heroes such as Nelson Mandela, Anne Frank and Malala Yousafzai, with beautiful illustrations from renowned international artists including Oliver Jeffers and Chris Riddell.

    Peter in Peril, by Helen Bate, is a graphic novel based on a true story about a boy named Peter who is Jewish and living in 1940s Hungary.

    Two Weeks with the Queen, by Morris Gleitzman, follows Colin, a young boy who has a plan to break into Buckingham Palace. It is a witty and empathetic book that deals with some difficult themes, such as bereavement and homophobia.

    The Bone Sparrow, by Zana Fraillon,winner of theAmnesty CILIP Honour 2017,highlights the plight of Burma’s Rohingya people and details life inside a detention centre in Australia.

    Tender Earth, by Sita Brahmachari,is about 11-year-old Laila Levenson who feels daunted by the prospect of secondary school but begins to find her own voice after discoveringNana Josie’s protest book.

    Sputnik’s Guide to Life on Earth, by Frank Cottrell Boyce,follows Sputnik and Prez on a series of unbelievable mishaps, scrapes and adventures, and celebrates the importance of finding a home in a very big universe.

    The Hypnotist, by Laurence Anholt,tells the tale of 13-year-old Pip who has to battle racial hatred when he goes to work as a farmhand. Set during the civil rights struggles of 1960s America,The Hypnotist explores the nature of prejudice and racist violence in a thoughtful and original way.

    The Journey, by Francesca Sanna, explores the theme of migration through a child’s eyes as a mother and her two young children are forced to flee their country.

    The Girl of Ink and Stars, by Kiran Millwood Hargrave, is a captivating story about Isabella, the daughter of a cartographer, who is the only person with the skills to find her best friend Lupe when she goes missing.

    A Story Like The Wind, by Jill Lewis and illustrated by Jo Weaver, tells intertwined stories about loneliness, the need for shelter, and how music can provide solace for those who are struggling.

    Amnesty’s top books for teens: 13-16 years

    Max, by Sarah Cohen-Scali, is about Max, a boy born into the Nazi Lebensborn programme designed to engineer ‘perfect’ Aryan children, who comes to question the world view he has been fed growing up.

    Here I Stand: Stories that Speak for Freedom, is a compelling collection of stories, poems and graphic narratives put together by Amnesty which explore different aspects of our human rights.

    The Art of Being Normal, by Lisa Williamson, is a powerful portrayal of two young people struggling to assert their identity in an often hostile and unforgiving world

    Lies We Tell Ourselves, by Robin Talley, is a coming-of-age novel about two brave young women who confront racism and homophobia to live as they choose.

    The Stars at Oktober Bend, by Glenda Millard, is narrated by 15-year-old Alice Nightingale who has suffered a brain injury and struggles to express herself. It explores themes of sexual assault, poverty and racism.

    The Hate U Give, by Angie Thomas, is inspired by the ‘Black Lives Matter’ movement and follows 16-year-old Starr, whose life changes forever when she witnesses a policeman murder her childhood friend, Khalil.

    Orangeboy, by Patrice Lawrence, is a fast-paced thriller that gives an original and fresh perspective on the struggles facing London’s teenagers and the pressures that surround gang culture.

    Salt to the Sea, by Ruta Sepetys,follows a host of characters in Germany 1945 as they seek shelter from the Red Army aboard theWilhelm Gustlof. This is a tragic story that has rarely been told.

    Alpha, by Bessora and Barroux, is a graphic novel that follows the story of a father who leaves Ivory Coast in the hope of reaching Paris to be reunited with his wife and child.

    Straight Outta Crongton, by Alex Wheatle, follows 15-year-old Mo growing up in the tough, crime-ridden neighbourhood of South Crong.

    Sex & Sexuality: 11 Books for Teens

    There are few things more squirm-inducing for teenagers (and adults) than sitting down for a discussion on what is going on with their bodies and why they are having certain feelings, I have sat through PSHE and well-being lessons that have resembled Dante’s Inferno with damned souls writhing in what seems to be (for them) an eternity of torment.

    Having worked in libraries for ages I have come to learn that sometimes it is preferable (for young people anyway) to have a decent collection of books on puberty, sex and sexuality that they can borrow unofficially and return later in secret.

    The books below are nine of the most popular books on this subject that I have in my collection (inasmuch they disappear with great frequency) and two recently published books that I think will be as popular.

    The Girl Files All about Puberty and Growing Up– Jacqui Bailey
    The Girl Files
    This is Not a Sex Book – Chusita & Maria Llovet
    this is not a sex book
    This Book is Gay – Juno Dawson
    this book is gay
    Being a Boy – Juno Dawson illus. Spike Gerrel
    being a boy
    The Gender Games – Juno Dawson
    the gender games
    Being a Girl – Hayley Long, illustrated by Gemma Correll
    being a girl
    The Boy Files: Puberty, Growing Up and All That Stuff – Alex Hooper-Hodgson
    the boy files
    Sex, Snogs, Dates and Mates – Anita Naik
    sex snogs dates
    How to Be a Girl the common Sense Guide to Girlhood – Anita Naik
    how to be a girl
    Periods, Zits and Other Bits – Charlotte Owen
    periods-zits-and-other-bits
    Doing It: Let’s Talk About Sex… – Hannah Witton
    doing it

    As with all book lists this is not meant to be exhaustive, if colleagues reading this have other books they would like to suggest please do so in the comments below.

    Feminist Fiction, Graphic Novels & Non-Fiction (a list in progress)

    Novels

  • Speak – Laurie Halse Anderson
  • The Handmaid’s Tale – Margaret Atwood
  • The Making of Mollie – Anna Carey
  • Sorcerer to the Crown – Zen Cho
  • The Hunger Games – Suzanne Collins
  • Beauty Queens – Libba Bray
  • The Lie Tree – Frances Hardinge
  • The Bermudez Triangle – Maureen Johnson
  • A Wrinkle in Time – Madeleine L’Engle
  • Ash – Malinda Lo
  • The Disreputable History of Frankie Landau-Banks – e. Lockheart
  • Dumplin’ – Julie Murphy
  • Only Ever Yours – Louise O’Neill
  • Asking For It – Louise O’Neill
  • Alanna – Tamora Pierce
  • The Ruby in the Smoke – Philip Pullman
  • How I Live Now – Meg Rosoff
  • Stargirl – Jerry Spinelli
  • Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry – Mildred D. Taylor
  • The Hate You Give – Angie Thomas
  • Maresi – Maria Turtschaninoff
  • Code Name Verity – Elizabeth Wein
  • Black Dove, White Raven – Elizabeth Wein
  • Uglies –Scott Westerfeld
  • Blood Red Road – Moira Young
  • The Book Thief – Marcus Zusak
     
    Graphic Novels
     

  • Captain Marvel: Higher, Further, Faster, More – Kelly Sue Deconnick and David Lopez
  • Ghost World – Daniel Clowes
  • Hark! A Vagrant – Kate Beaton
  • Hilda – Luke Pearson
  • Lumberjanes – Shannon Watters, Grace Ellis, Brooke A. Allen and Noelle Stevenson
  • Ms. Marvel – G. Willow Wilson and Adrian Alphona
  • Paper Girls – Brian K. Vaughan and Cliff Chiang
  • Persepolis – Marjane Satrapi
  • Sally Heathcote Suffragette – Mary M. Talbot, Kate Charlesworth and Bryan Talbot
  • Skim – Jillian Tamaki & Mariko Tamaki
  • This One Summer – Jillian Tamaki & Mariko Tamaki
  • The Unbeatable Squirrel Girl – Ryan North and Erica Henderson
     
    Non-Fiction
     

  • Crafting with Feminism – Bonnie Burton
  • Fantastically Great Women Who Changed The World – Kate Pankhurst
  • We Should All Be Feminists – Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
  • Wonder Women 25 Innovators, Inventors, and Trailblazers Who Changed History – Sam Maggs
  •  
    Compiling a list of books on a subject as emotive as Feminism is difficult and often prone to sparking arguments as books are left out or sometimes disagreed upon due to a variety of factors. If you would like to suggest books for inclusion please feel free to do so in the comments section below, disagreements are also welcome!

    Refugees, Immigrants & Asylum-Seekers: a short list

    This list is a companion to http://teenlibrarian.co.uk/2015/11/20/book-list-refugees/

    As we become immersed in the 2016 Christmas it is important to remember that the reason for the season was a refugee for a large part of his early life, not only that he was the son of a single mother from Palestine.

    We are exhorted to welcome him into our hearts, what do you think the chances are of he and his family being welcomed to seek sanctuary in the UK in this day and age?

    I have put together a short list of books about refugees, immigrants and asylum-seekers for readers of all ages below.

    refuge-booth
    Refuge by Anne Booth and Sam Usher, it is the Christmas story seen through the eyes of the Donkey, simply told with beautiful illustrations it is a timeless work that could be the story of a refugee family today.

    Refuge is published by Nosy Crow

    Alpha SOFTCOVER 13mm.indd
    Alpha: Abidjan to Gare du Nord by Bessora and Barroux, translated by Sarah Ardizzone is a heart-breaking, award-winning graphic novel detailing the journey Alpha takes from his village in Cote d’Ivoire to Europe. With a visa this would only take a few hours but for refugees it is a dangerous, life-threatening journey of many months.

    Alpha is published by Barrington Stoke
    sun-star-yoon
    The Sun is Also a Star by Nicola Yoon a love set in New York City, between Daniel a Korean-American and Natasha the daughter of illegal immigrants from Jamaica and the 12 hours they spend together before her family is deported.

    The Sun is Also a Star is published by Penguin

    arrival-tan
    The Arrival by Shaun Tan is a wordless graphic novel detailing the arrival of a migrant in a strange, foreign land. The Arrival is a masterclass of wordless storytelling, showing through imagery the difficulty migrants often face when arriving in an alien culture.

    The Arrival is published by Hodder Children’s Books

    falling-star
    Every Falling Star by Sungju Lee and Susan McClelland is the chilling memoir of Sungju Lee’s life as a street child and later his escape from North Korea to a new life in Canada.

    Every Falling Star is published by Amulet Books

    journey-sanna
    The Journey by Francesca Sanna is a picture book that has an effect like an unexpected punch to the stomach. After the death of her husband in a civil war, a woman takes her two children on a journey towards safety. I have never read a picture book that affected me so deeply, perfect for discussing war and refugees with readers of all ages.

    The Journey is published by Flying Eye Books

    A List of Books for Safer Internet Day

    A list of books to suggest to students when discussing online safety and Internet use.

    Chicken Clicking – Jean Willis & Tony Ross
    Dark Poppy’s Demise – S.A. Partridge
    Defriended – Ruth Baron
    Exposed – Susan Vaught
    Followers – Anna Davies
    Identity Theft – Anna Davies
    Little Brother – Cory Doctorow
    Ready Player One – Ernest Cline
    Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda – Becky Albertali
    Want To go Private? – Sarah Darer Littman
    Web of Darkness – Bali Rai

    Book List: Refugees

    A selection of books about refugees from around the world for young readers

  • The Arrival by Shaun Tan
  • The Breadwinner
    Mud City
    Parvana’s Journey
    My Name is Parvana by Deborah Ellis
  • Looking at the Stars by Jo Cotterill
  • Close to the Wind by Jon Walter
  • Kiss the Dust by Elizabeth Laird
  • Little Soldier by Bernard Ashley
  • Mahtab’s Story by Libby Gleeson
  • The Other Side of Truth by Beverley Naidoo
  • Refugee Boy by Benjamin Zephaniah
  • Boy Overboard
    Girl Underground by Morris Gleitzman
  • Home is a Place Called Nowhere by Leon Rosselson
  • A Long Walk to Water by Linda Sue Park
  • Bamboo People by Mitali Perkins
  • Now Is The Time For Running by Michael Williams
  • Out of Nowhere by Maria Padian
  • Where I Belong by Gillian Cross
  • Shadow by Michael Morpurgo
  • A Hare in the Elephant’s Trunk by Jan Coates
  • The Milk of Birds by Sylvia Whitman
  • Refuge by Anne Booth & Samuel Usher
  • The Unforgotten Coat by Frank Cottrell Boyce
  • Azzi in Between by Sarah Garland
  • The Colour of Home by Mary Hoffman and Karin Littlewood
  • See also: The Letterbox Library list of books about refugees & migration
    http://www.letterboxlibrary.com/acatalog/Refugees_and_Migration.html

    Book List: Child Soldiers

    child soldiers header
    A list of novels, comics and non-fiction about children and teenagers that through necessity, trickery or coercion become soldiers

    Alex Rider series by Anthony Horowitz
    A Long Way Gone – Ishmael Beah
    Attack on Titan (manga) – Hajime Isayama
    Boy Soldier – Andy McNab
    Buffalo Soldier – Tanya Landman
    Charley’s War (graphic novel) – Pat Mills & drawn by Joe Colquhoun
    CHERUB series – Robert Muchamore
    Child Soldier – Jessica Dee Humphreys & Claudia Davila
    Chronicles of Narnia – C.S. Lewis
    Code Name Verity – Elizabeth Wein
    Ender’s Game – Orson Scott Card
    Fullmetal Alchemist (manga) – Hiromu Arakawa
    Harry Potter series – J.K. Rowling
    How I Live Now – Meg Rosoff
    Leviathan trilogy – Scott Westerfeld
    Little Soldier – Bernard Ashley
    Percy Jackson series – Rick Riordan
    Refugee Boy – Benjamin Zephaniah
    Rose Under Fire – Elizabeth Wein
    The Hero and the Crown & The Blue Sword – Robin McKinley
    The Hunger Games – Suzanne Collins
    Tomorrow When the War Began – John Marsden
    Warchild – Emmanuel Jal

    Read any Good Films Lately?

    white barrierwhite barrierwhite barrier

    The Academy Awards took place yesterday. To celebrate I put together a display based on novels (mostly for children and young people) that have been adapted for film and television.

    The centrepiece of my display is my Reading Oscar:
    white barrier
    I used my photocopier to enlarge him to eye-catching size and placed my version of the Hipster Kitty next to him:
    white barrier

    The books I used are:

    Angus, Thongs and Full-Frontal Snogging by Louise Rennison
    Beautiful Creatures by Kami Garcia and Margaret Stohl
    Before I Die by Jenny Downham
    The Book Thief by Markus Zusak
    The Chronicles of Narnia by C.S. Lewis
    City of Ember by Jeanne DuPrau
    Confessions of a Teenage Drama Queen by Dyan Sheldon
    Coraline by Neil Gaiman
    The Dark is Rising by Susan Cooper
    Divergent by Veronica Roth
    Dracula by Bram Stoker
    the DUFF by Kody Keplinger
    The Earthsea Trilogy by Ursula le Guin
    Ender’s Game by Orson Scott Card
    Eragon by Christopher Paolini
    The Fault in Our Stars by John Green
    Gansta Granny by David Walliams
    The Giver by Lois Lowry
    Harry Potter by J.K. Rowling
    The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams
    The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings trilogy by J.R.R. Tolkien
    Holes by Louis Sachar
    How I Live Now by Meg Rosoff
    Howl’s Moving Castle by Diana Wynne Jones
    The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins
    I Am Number Four by Pittacus Lore
    I Know What You did Last Summer by Lois Duncan
    Inkheart by Cornelia Funke
    The Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold
    Matilda by Roald Dahl
    The Maze Runner by James Dashner
    Mortal Instruments: City of Bones by Cassandra Clare
    Millions by Frank Cottrell Boyce
    Nick and Norah’s infinite Playlist by Rachel Cohn & David Levithan
    Northern Lights by Phillip Pullman
    Percy Jackson series by Rick Riordan
    The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky
    The Princess Diaries by Meg Cabot
    Sherlock Holmes by Arthur Conan Doyle
    Stormbreaker by Anthony Horowitz
    Twilight sequence by Stephenie Meyer
    Vampire Academy by Richelle Mead
    Winter’s Bone by Daniel Woodrell

    If you would like to create your own book of the movie display you can download the Reading Oscar here and Hipster Kitty here

    YA Superhero Novels

    There is a growing body of work for fans of YA novels dedicated to the superhuman – be they hero, villain or something in-between. This is a list of titles that I have read, enjoyed and can safely recommend as being some of the best of the genre.

    sidekick
    Katie Holmes, aged 17, lives with her adoptive mother, the housekeeper of a fabulous house in Camps Bay belonging to the gorgeous hunk Finn O’Reilly. Finn has the ability to stop time, to move into what is called “untime”. Katie can’t stop time but, uniquely, can function in “untime” and works as a partner, a sidekick, to Finn.
    white barrier
    SteeleartTen years ago, Calamity came. It was a burst in the sky that gave ordinary men and women extraordinary powers. The awed public started calling them Epics. But Epics are no friend of man. With incredible gifts came the desire to rule. And to rule man you must crush his wills.

    Nobody fights the Epics… nobody but the Reckoners. A shadow group of ordinary humans, they spend their lives studying Epics, finding their weaknesses, and then assassinating them.

    And David wants in. He wants Steelheart – the Epic who is said to be invincible. The Epic who killed David’s father. For years, like the Reckoners, David’s been studying, and planning – and he has something they need. Not an object, but an experience.

    He’s seen Steelheart bleed. And he wants revenge.
    white barrier
    firefightThe sequel to Steelheart
    white barrier
    OTHERGIRL-cover-rgb-667x1024Louise and Erica have been best friends since forever. They’re closer than sisters and depend on each other for almost everything. Just one problem: Erica has superpowers.

    When Erica isn’t doing loop-the-loops in the sky or burning things with her heat pulse powers, she needs Louise to hold her non-super life together. After all, the girls still have homework, parents and boys to figure out. But being a superhero’s BFF is not easy, especially as trouble has a way of seeking them out. Soon Louise discovers that Erica might be able to survive explosions and fly faster than a speeding bullet, but she can’t win every fight by herself.

    Life isn’t a comic book – it’s even crazier than that.

    Othergirl is out soon
    white barrier
    herocomSurfing the net during a lightning storm has amazing consequences for a group of teenage friends. Superhero powers are theirs at the click of a mouse! Trouble is, they don’t know what the powers will be until they try them out …

    But super powers carry super responsibilities. When a weather-altering, world-conquering supervillain kidnaps their mum, they have to decide: save her …or save the world!
    white barrier

    vicious-book-cover-v-e-schwabVictor and Eli started out as college roommates brilliant, arrogant, lonely boys who recognized the same ambition in each other. A shared interest in adrenaline, near-death experiences, and seemingly supernatural events reveals an intriguing possibility: that under the right conditions, someone could develop extraordinary abilities. But when their thesis moves from the academic to the experimental, things go horribly wrong.

    Ten years later, Victor breaks out of prison, determined to catch up to his old friend (now foe), aided by a young girl with a stunning ability. Meanwhile, Eli is on a mission to eradicate every other super-powered person that he can find aside from his sidekick, an enigmatic woman with an unbreakable will. Armed with terrible power on both sides, driven by the memory of betrayal and loss, the arch-nemeses have set a course for revenge but who will be left alive at the end?
    white barrier

    No Super Hero is complete without a Super Villain to rise against:

    villain
    When Jake, the school bully, deliberately infects the school’s IT system with a virus, he starts receiving strange emails. Somebody is inviting him to join them in ‘conquering the world’ and they send him a link to a website: VILLAIN.NET. It only takes a few clicks before Jake finds himself signed up to an entire world of supervillains.
    white barrier
    hivecoverOtto Malpense may only be thirteen years old, but so far he has managed to run the orphanage where he lives, and he has come up with a plan clever enough to trick the most powerful man in the country. He is the perfect candidate to become the world’s next supervillain.

    That is why he ends up at H.I.V.E., handpicked to become a member of the incoming class. The students have been kidnapped and brought to a secluded island inside a seemingly active volcano, where the school has resided for decades. All the kids are elite; they are the most athletic, the most technically advanced, and the smartest in the country. Inside the cavernous marble rooms, floodlit hangars, and steel doors, the students are enrolled in Villainy Studies and Stealth and Evasion 101. But what Otto soon comes to realize is that this is a six-year program, and leaving is not an option.