Monthly Archives: April 2015

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Talk Nerdy 2 Me

Crazy about Cosplay? Starry-eyed over Star Trek or Wars? Maybe you even get dotty over the Doctor! Even if you are new to nerding, everybody is welcome to get their geek on at Talk Nerdy 2 Me (TN2M) on Friday 8th May at the Harris Library in Preston!

There will be a wide range of guests from Matt “Mecha-Man” Dickinson to Deborah Simms from the Great British Sewing Bee. It will be an evening of activities and competitions, including stalls from Game, Waterstones, the comic shop and many more.

This year there will also be sign language interpreters at all the talks and panels.

Fore the altest up to date news about guestsand events check out the Talk Nerdy 2 Me Facebook page and book a free ticket (to guarantee entrance) here: http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/talk-nerdy-2-me-preston-tickets-16672436707 and follow them on twitter: @talknerdytwome

Recommended by a Librarian: Ms. Marvel: No Normal

The Recommending Librarian this week is: Lauren Gibaldi

What Are You Recommending? Ms. Marvel Volume 1: No Normal

nonormal

What is it?

It’s a graphic novel about the new Ms. Marvel, Kamala Khan. The majority of the first volume deals with her realizing that a teenage Muslim girl from Jersey City can be a superhero, too.

Why have you recommended it?

Kamala is funny and strong and wonderfully real. She deals with her parents being embarrassing as much as villains ruining the city. I give this to all of my patrons, regardless of age. She’s a fresh face in the Marvel universe, and I’m so excited for her second volume to be out!

Playing in the Clouds: an Introduction to Cloud-based Technology for Year 8s

Over the past two weeks I have been introducing students to cloud-based services.

I have started with Google services, specifically Google Docs, Slides and Calendar.

They were shocked and awed at the practical display of how multiple users can edit documents (I had previously created two gmail accounts for this purpose). I did have one student bemoan the fact that this technology means the end of the “my computer crashed and I lost my homework” excuse. They started discussing how they could use a multiple edit document as a chat service and they were even more amazed when I showed them that there is chat functionality built in to Docs so they can talk as well as work. I also pointed out that if they were chatting in the middle of a joint essay they may forget to delete their comments and hand in something inappropriate to their teacher.

This week I will be showing how Google docs can be edited via mobile devices and introduce them to using Picasa to store images for projects.

I have also created Pinterest accounts for my teaching gmail accounts and will show my students how to use them to store websites and online information as proto-bibliographies.

Following on from this I will introduce them to free (legal) software and how to stay safe (and anonymous) online.

The Children’s Literacy Charter & the UK

Nal’ibali (isiXhosa for “here’s the story”) is a South African reading-for-enjoyment campaign to spark children’s potential through storytelling and reading.

Last year during International World Book Day they released a Children’s Literacy Charter for South Africa.

Download (PDF, 580KB)

While at a glance the Literacy Charter does bear a slight resemblance to Pennac’s Right’s of the Reader it is specifically geared towards enabling children to develop a love of reading and learning.

I had been entertaining some thoughts about adapting the charter for the UK but after playing around with it I have instead decided to push for it to be adopted over here as the wording is inclusive and only minor changes would be needed for a UL/European setting. This, of course is dependent on obtaining Nal’ibali’s blessing to do this.

Nal’ibali: Children’s Literacy Charter

Every year on 23 April, South Africa celebrates World Book Day, which was created by UNESCO as a worldwide celebration of books and reading. It is celebrated in over 100 countries around the globe to make everyone more aware of how reading can be a satisfying and enjoyable activity – and of course, to invest in our children’s literacy.

Last year on World Book Day, Nal’ibali launched their Children’s Literacy Charter. This charter describes the literacy experiences all children should have if we want them to grow up being able to use reading and writing successfully in their lives. (If you missed it last year, download your copy of the Children’s Literacy Charter in any of South Africa’s languages here!). This year they are launching a version of this charter especially for children so that they become more aware of what they need to help them grow a love of reading, writing and books.

Endorsed by the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), The International Board on Books for Young People (IBBY International), The South African Book Development Council / National Book Week, The Publishers Association of South Africa (PASA), the Little Hands Trust, and PEN South Africa, the children’s literacy rights poster is available in 11 official languages.

You can view the English language version of the poster below.

nalibali rights

To download a copy of the poster in any of South Africa’s 11 official languages, visit this link:

http://nalibali.org/childrens-literacy-rights-poster/

Text and poster are from the Na’libali website

Recommended by a Librarian: In Bloom by Matthew Crow

The Recommending Librarian this week is: Hannah Saks

What are you recommending?

Why have you recommended it?

In Bloom is the story of Francis, a teenage boy who has been diagnosed with leukaemia. In order to receive treatment, Francis has to spend an extended period of time in a special ward for young people like him. He finds it difficult to get on with anyone on the ward but then Amber joins them. In Amber he finds a partner in crime and someone who has to deal with a mum as mad as his own.

When a story involves a teenager with a serious illness falling in love for the first time you might think you know exactly how the story will go. What I loved about In Bloom is that it was actually a very funny book. Francis is one of the most authentic teenage characters I’ve read in years, full of doubts one minute and ridiculous over-confidence the next. Matthew Crow has created characters that are realistic and relatable that will get inside your head and stay with you long after you’ve finished reading.

#Milifandom

This morning I was introduced to what is possibly the strangest and most exciting thing in politics and fandom today – the Milifandom.

Note for those that may not be aware of the term, Fandom (according to Wikipedia) is:
a portmanteau consisting of fan [fanatic] plus the suffix -dom, as in kingdom, it is a term used to refer to a subculture composed of fans characterized by a feeling of empathy and camaraderie with others who share a common interest. Fans typically are interested in even minor details of the object(s) of their fandom and spend a significant portion of their time and energy involved with their interest, often as a part of a social network with particular practices (a fandom); this is what differentiates “fannish” (fandom-affiliated) fans from those with only a casual interest.

There is a firm belief among a number of adults that teens are not interested in politics.

I think that the #Milifandom proves them wrong; they are engaging with politics on their own terms and that is where we should meet them, not by trying to talk seriously about politics but by sharing their joy and excitement over the leader of the Labour Party. This is seriously cool and something that we should all celebrate!

In my experience nothing can turn a teenager off faster than rushing at them with something that you tell them you think they should love.

Imagine what would have happened if the Labour Party had approached the youth of the UK to form a leadership fan club?

I do not think that it would have ended well!

How did this fandom happen?

It is possible that teens identify with him, as the majority of young people at some point or other in their lives face bullying, body shaming and awkward photographs of themselves; maybe they have been won over by his earnestness and honesty in the face of bile and disdain. It could be the fact that he sometimes does not look as sleek and polished as the majority of other male politicians or they have been won over by his geeky coolness.

Whatever it is that has ignited their interest, Ed Miliband now has a grass-roots youth following that is (to my knowledge) unprecedented in modern UK politics.

So to everyone that says the youth of the UK are apathetic and uninterested in anything other than superficial pursuits I think I can safely say: think again! It may not be political engagement as you know it, but they are getting engaged and you should feel uncertain because they are bringing their views to the table!

The leader of the #Milifandom movement is on Twitter: @twcuddleston

In the interests of fairness, I will also note that there is now also a David Cameron fandom: The #Cameronettes

Inside the Box: a Selection of Comics and Graphic Novels for All Ages


The Federation of Children’s Book Groups is a national voluntary organisation, whose aim is to promote enjoyment and interest in children’s books and reading.

They also produce a range of brilliant book lists, their latest is called Inside the Box. Compiled by Mélanie McGilloway and Zoë Toft (with support from Neil Cameron) it is a comprehensive list ranging from picture books and comics for all ages to comics for teenagers and young adults. The list also suggests several books about comics and comic creation as well as weekly comic magazines.

This list is essential for those that feel that they do not have the breadth of knowledge needed to make informed decisions on selecting graphic novels for a school or public library and even for librarians that know their comics there are introductions to new titles.

Find out more about the FCBG here and see what book-lists they have available

You can order copies of Inside the Box and other book-lists by e-mailing the Federation at: info@fcbg.org.uk

Delete Blog Tour

Extract from Jeff Povey's Delete by SimonKidsUK

WIN:
One of two copies of DELETE by Jeff Povey

Name the three teens that escaped from the empty world you can find the answers in the extract. Leave your answer in the comments field (comments will remain hidden until the end of the competition)

The competition will run for the duration of the blog tour and is open internationally.

Check out stop 2 on the Delete Blog Tour over at Fiction Fascination

Teen Librarian Monthly April 2015

Download (PDF, Unknown)