Category Archives: Authors

Eight Questions With… Anthony McGowan

Hi Tony, and welcome (finally) to Eight Questions With… an interview for Teen Librarian. I was just trying to work out why considering how long we have known each other I have never interviewed you before – do you have any idea why?

I seem to remember that you did interview me for Teen Librarian, back in the Henry Tumour period … In fact, YES! Found it.

Editor’s note: yes, I did interview Tony, it appeared way back in 2007, you can read it here: TLM May 2007 Now let us never mention this embarrassing incident again and get on with the interview…

You currently have three books published by Barrington StokeThe Fall, Brock & Pike, would you be able to give a short introduction to each for readers that may not have already discovered these?

It might be easiest if I discuss Brock and Pike first. They both feature brothers Nicky and Kenny. At the beginning of Brock their family is in a bit of a mess. Their mum has left them, and their father can’t really cope – he’s lost his job, and generally fallen apart. Nicky is the narrator, and acts as a sort of carer for Kenny, who has special needs. Nicky thinks the best word to describe his brother is ‘simple’ –

People say he’s simple, and he is. I know you’re not meant to say ‘simple-minded’ anymore, but it seems to me that it’s the exact right word for Kenny. He hasn’t got all the stuff going on that mess up other people’s heads. He isn’t always trying to work out the angles, or how to stitch you up. He thinks other people are as kind as he is, and he only has one idea at a time. His brain was starved of oxygen when he was getting born, so now he has what they 9781781124666call learning difficulties. But, like I say, I think ‘simple’ is better and kinder and truer than talking about ‘difficulties’ or ‘disabilities’.

The Nicky-Kenny relationship is the key to the two novels. In Brock, they save a badger from a terrible fate, and Pike is a sort of treasure hunt/adventure story about a body in a lake, and a gold watch, but the relationship between the brothers remains central. They’re stories about love and friendship and redemption. The boys love helps to save the family. Unusually, for me (!) the books have upbeat endings.

The Fall is a rather darker book, telling two traumatic linked tales, about a kid called Mog. The book is about betrayal, and bullying, but doesn’t end well … But I think it has a certain bleak power.

I recall reading a while ago that Brock & Pike are the first two parts of a trilogy – is this true or is my brain making up things as I have not been able to find anything about it?
fall mcg
I decided that The Fall was just too depressing – especially as the main character is partly based on me, so I bring Mog back in Pike, giving him a kind of redemption, too. So The Fall, Brock and Pike do finally form a sort of loose trilogy.

You are one of the most entertaining authors I follow on twitter and facebook, will you ever be producing a book or e-book of your online musings & conversations?

Hah! Well, a few people have suggested it. I’m not much good at Twitter – my speciality is a sort of rambling surrealist anecdote, and I can’t squeeze that into a tweet. My whimsy really needs the greater length of Facebook. But I do think that some of the best things I’ve ever written have been ‘wasted’ on Facebook, so it would be quite nice to give them a second life.

Are you currently working on anything you can share with the audience? (I am hoping for a follow-up to Hello Darkness as it was one of my favourite reads last year)

I’ve just finished a book I’ve been writing on with another author – the brilliant Jo Nadin. It’s called Everybody Hurts, and it’s a twisted little love story, written from male and female perspectives. The first draft is done, and we’re about to give it a final polish. It probably won’t come out until 2017, as these things always seem to take forever. I’m also well into a huge blockbuster horror project – a sort of Stephen King for teens. The working title is The Wrath. There’s a lot of blood.

Apart from your books, can you recommend any other titles on the Barrington Stoke teen lists?

Barrington Stoke, although small, attract some amazing authors – Kevin Brooks, Keith Gray, Meg Rosoff, Sally Nicholls, Aidan Chambers, Eoin Colfer, Frank Cottrell Boyce, to name but some. Really, you can’t go wrong with any of their Barrington Stoke books.

Are any of your works based on personal experiences?

They all are, to some extent – even the mad, surreal ones, like Hellbent and Hello Darkness. But Brock and Pike are very much set in the small town where I was brought up – Sherburn in Elmet, in Yorkshire. Although it isn’t named, anyone from Sherburn would recognise it instantly. But, in general, most of my characters are versions of people I’ve met. Warped, twisted versions …

Lastly what are you currently reading and would you recommend it to a bunch of librarians?

I’m working my way though the My Struggle sequence by Karl Ove Knausgård – which reads a bit like a po-faced version of my facebook posts. It has a richness and depth, but can also be a bit … dull. So not sure I’d recommend it. What I would certainly recommend, however, is How To Be A Public Author, by Francis Plug (really Paul Ewen) – an hysterical novel about a drunken would be writer, who attends every possible book event to learn the job. It’s ludicrously funny and silly, but also oddly moving, and a tribute to all us bibliophiles.

Thank you so much for giving up your time to participate in this interview!

Zeroes: Favourite Characters and thoughts on Collaboration

margo author picMargo Lanagan

Favourite Character

My favourite character in Zeroes is Crash. She’s observant, thoughtful, basically good-hearted and trying really hard to be responsible. Her power is that she can sense any networked systems around her—any phones, computers, security systems, anything relying on a satellite, wifi, broadband or even a humble optical fibre cable. What’s bad about this power is that:

(a) It hurts to feel all these things—being in a big crowd is like being stung by a swarm of bees, with everyone’s phone’s attacking her, and places with big complex networks are torture for her

(b) If she doesn’t actually make an effort to keep these systems functioning, they crash—hence her code name. So she can do a lot of damage.

She’s also got a very strong moral sense. She’s caught between loving the cleansing relief of crashing things that have been bugging her, and trying to obey her Mom’s rule of Do no harm. She’s an interesting character!

On Collaboration

Compared to writing a novel by myself, I have to say, writing a three-author novel was a piece of cake. I was only technically writing a third of it, even though I still had to be fully engaged with Scott’s and Deborah’s chapters. We all read each other’s chapters, noting where things don’t chime with our own chapters, or where we feel our characters haven’t been done right. Pointing out the number of times Scott used the words “sparkling” or “sputtered”…

Generating the plot was so much easier than my usual method, where I spend months drawing plot maps that don’t work, and drafting screeds of material that never gets used. Not that we didn’t throw stuff away—sometimes our plot got superseded by something cooler. But it all happened so fast! And sitting around at Plot Camp making each other laugh with stupid plot ideas is the best fun. I can highly recommend collaboration.

Scott Westerfeld face600Scott Westerfeld

Favourite Character

My favorite character is probably Scam. His power is “the voice,” which says whatever will get him what he wants. In a way, the voice reminds me of smart-talking detectives in the pulp era, who could disarm the bad guys just by saying the right thing, or convince the cops to let them go if they were found in the wrong place at the wrong time.

Alas for Scam, he’s not as cool as Sam Spade. Growing up with the voice on his side has left him not very proficient with words. He’s never had to learn! So he’s sort of like a kid who’s big brother always protected him, and has never fought his own battles.

On Collaboration

For me, collaborating is like going back in time. When I was a younger novelist, the bad days of writing were dark and horrible and full of despair. The good days were the most amazing I’ve ever had. That’s how things work when you’re new at something–the highs are very high, the lows disastrous.

But since then I’ve written twenty-something novels, and the lows aren’t really that bad anymore. I know from experience that I will get through this. Alas, this also means the highs aren’t as great. But writing with Deb and Margo has brought back those highs. There are sentences and scenes in this book that I never would have managed on my own. And the bad times? Well, let’s just say there are three times as many people to get annoyed with.

DeborahBiancottiDeborah Biancotti

Favourite Character

My favourite character is Flicker, because she’s the one I can most imagine having lunch with. She seems like she’s the sanest and most well-grounded. Maybe it’s a result of having to—literally!—see through other people’s eyes. Despite being born blind, she can see—but only when there’s someone else nearby whose eyes are open.

Of course, every power has a price. Flicker can become overwhelmed by all the different viewpoints that she’s trying to parse in her head. Imagine trying to see a dozen things at once, or a dozen viewpoints on the same thing. And sometimes, she ends up seeing something she really, really doesn’t want to see.

On Collaboration

For me, collaborations are the way of the future. They’re like supercharged writing. TV writers learned this before novelists did. Collaboration lets you air your craziest, wildest ideas. It lets you short-circuit the plotting exercise. You can throw a half-baked idea at your team and then bounce it around between you until it becomes something great. Or you can have your idea shot down in flames within a matter of minutes. That happens.

The best part of the Zeroes collaboration has been what we call Plot Camps. We leave our ordinary lives and come together for three or four days of detailed planning. We work out what will happen and which character will be most affected, and whose point of view chapter this will be. It’s only when you’re back home, alone, trying to make your chapters fit the glamorous ideas of Plot Camp that the doubt begins to creep in. “Why did I agree to this?” and “Can I even pull this off?” are constant companions.


Prattling about Pocket Pirates… an Interview with Chris Mould

Hi Chris, welcome to TeenLibrarian for the Pocket Pirates Q&A!

captain crabsticksAs is traditional I usually ask first time visitors to the site to introduce themselves to the audience, so can you please let us know something about you?

Hi Matt, yes of course. I’m an illustrator at heart and have been for over twenty years.

I began to write to create narrative content that made sense of the worlds and characters growing out of my sketchbook and from there, I began to write ‘in real life.’ Proof that anybody can do it if they really want to.
Without giving too many spoilers can you tell us something about the Pocket Pirates?

The home of the pocket pirates is one of miniature people in a human sized environment. So whether it’s being stuck inside an old teapot, having to climb a stack of old books just to get back home, being harassed by a swarm of huge flies or trying to retrieve a stash of biscuit crumbs, the world is a tricky place when you’re only an inch high, even for a brave buccaneer. But the biggest danger comes from the mice beyond the skirting board and the eight legged menace in the tangled web up above. Look out, the enemy are hungry. It’s dangerous out there in the Old Junk Shop.

jonesHow did you come up with the idea of daring pirates living in a bottle ship?

To be honest I was ready to have a rest from Buccaneers. They’re such a terrible lot. I was having a holiday and I spotted a ship in a bottle as I walked round an old shop. I was always a huge Borrowers and Old Mrs Pepperpot fan and I just thought to myself, ‘aha, tiny pirates would live in there.’ And the Pocket Pirates were born. It allowed me to look at pirates in a different way. They were land lubbers and they were little! What could be more fun?

LilyConsidering that they were basically muggers of the sea and worse back in the day (and still are in some parts of the world) why do you think that Pirates seem to be enduringly popular?

I don’t think it’s the habits of the pirate that people find endearing. There are endless pirate publications for children but most of them avoid any serious reference to cut throat lifestyles. I think it’s the period costume and the on board environment they live in that has timeless appeal for illustrators and authors. It’s a very well-trodden path I know. But creating character and narrative has a lot to do with visual appeal. What can be more fun than big pirate hats, striped socks, skulls and crossbones, frilly shirts, huge sleeved coats and a huge rickety old timber house that moves from place to place? And of course, your average pirate is a cheeky scallywag and we all love a mischievous rogue who can mix it up a bit.

old uncle nogginI have seen your name popping up a lot on twitter, most recently next to a map for Matt Haig’s Christmas book – where else can we find your artwork gracing other author’s words?

Ah yes, drawing pine trees and snowy landscapes in the middle of August was a good way to keep me cool this year (as well as living in the UK 😉 I’ve also been working with the hilariously funny Barry Hutchison on the Benjamin Blank fiction series for Nosy Crow. Tremendously chucklesome fun. Very funny writer.

Returning to things piratical, can you recommend books about pirates by other authors?

You mean the pirate enemy? On the other ship?? Of course not! Buy a copy of Pocket Pirates, and nothing else.

Oh go on then, if I must. Make sure you’ve seen Chris Riddell’s beautifully drawn Pirate Diary. And Shipmate Johnny Duddle is always a pirate winner. His new black and white pirate fiction is genius. And don’t miss the Jim Ladd and Benji Davies Space Pirates series from Nosy Crow. I could go on….
Who is your favourite fictional freebooter? and do you have any favourite non-fiction pirates?

Fiction: Ah I always come back to ‘Silver’. He’s THE BEST. Treasure Island is a text I can read over and over again. And I have to be staring at the Ralph Steadman version.

Non Fiction: I can’t favourite any of the real ones. They’re all bad uns and I’d lock em all up.

What is coming next for the Pocket Pirates?

In the next book the hungry Buccaneers dare to venture outside when their food supplies get low. I won’t give much away but when it rains and they are washed into a storm drain, the rain soaked fun begins.

To inject a bit of levity in to the serious subject of swashbucklers, do you have a favourite pirate joke, and can you share it?

Oh….. And my pirate joke…..


Why does it take a pirate so long to learn the alphabet?

Because he spends years at C!

Thank you so much for giving up your time to drop by and answer some questions!

Thank you Matt. Your support is hugely appreciated.

The Black Lotus Tour: Writing Books with Kids

Kids like writing, but all too often the joy of it gets lost in the mountains of school and home work. Let a child write about something they’re interested in, something meaningful, and the difference will be huge. I discovered this recently in a letter writing lesson. My pupils were required to write an imaginary letter to someone. The results were a little dull. Soon after, however, I arranged a class pen pal swap with a school in America. Once the kids had real pen pals to write to, their writing became alive with personality and enthusiasm.

They say the early childhood years are the formative years of any person’s life, but is it really true? In my case – yes, and here’s the proof. When I was a kid, I wrote two books – one called ‘The Magic Sword’ and one called ‘The Samurai’. Thirty years later, my first novel is published and guess what it’s about? Magic swords and samurai! It’s about other things too, but the influence of my childhood writing cannot be ignored. Writing a book as a child allowed me to experience the thrill of creating new worlds and characters, as well as the thrill of seeing somebody else read about them. Perhaps if I hadn’t written those books as a child, I’d never have become an author as an adult.
So when I became a teacher I decided to give other kids the opportunity to write a book, in the hope that it might influence their adult life. I started writing books with children in the pre-digital age, so we wrote and illustrated stories on sheets of paper and then stapled them together.

We then got involved with the ‘Write a Book’ scheme which was being run by education centres around the country. As part of this initiative, my pupils each wrote a book and then sent them off to be read and reviewed by other pupils. In return, we received a similar box of books. It was a fantastic scheme.

When computers came into the classroom, they took my book project to the next level. No longer did the child with the messy writing have to feel self-conscious about their handwriting. The printed word became the great leveller in the classroom. Sure, after reading the books, you could still tell which were better than others, but not anymore could you make this decision at first glance.
The printed word made the books feel more like real books. But with staples and sellotape for binding, they were still a long way off being the real deal. Then along came the internet, and following closely behind it, Print-On-Demand (POD) publishers.

So here’s what my pupils do now: they spend the first term of school preparing for the biggest writing project of their lives by doing all the regular stuff kids do in classrooms across the world. But this time, with a difference. Because now the ‘pointless’ writing activities are no longer pointless, but are training for the book they will write after Christmas.

After having plenty of writing practice in different genres in both fiction and non-fiction, they decide what their book will be about. They spend their Christmas holidays thinking about it, and then return to school in January fired up and ready to start. Free software is downloaded onto the school PCs and pupils spend the next three months writing, drafting, editing and typing their stories. They then illustrate their books with their own artwork or photos. Each book is then uploaded to the POD publisher’s server in America, before being printed in the Netherlands. Once the child’s book is posted, we track the package across Europe until it arrives at the classroom door. Nothing beats the excitement of opening that parcel with your own printed book inside.
Once all the books arrive at the school, we put away all class readers and use the pupils’ books as class reading material. Pupils read, comment on, and answer questions about each other’s books. Probably the only thing that beats writing your own book is seeing somebody else read and enjoy what you’ve written.

At the end of the year, when copies are thrown in the bin, and textbooks are discarded, these books are carefully brought home and proudly displayed on bookshelves for grandparents, uncles and aunties to see. And long after we’re all gone, some of these treasures will still survive, and hopefully will be picked up by some curious reader in the distant future.

My childhood creation led to what is now a passion in my adult life. I’m hoping it will do the same for some of my pupils.

The Black Lotus by Kieran Fanning published by Chicken House.

Follow Kieran on Twitter @kieranjfanning and find out more at and

The Secret Fire: Interview with Carina Rozenfeld and CJ Daugherty

Alchemy… the occult science devoted to matter transmutation, best known for the search for eternal life and the quest to turn lead into gold.

Now two authors, CJ Daugherty and Carina Rozenfeld have combined their talents and turned mere ink and paper into literary gold with their new book The Secret Fire.

The power of two does not end there today two blogs have two interviews about the creation of the novel. Read the interviews below in French and then follow the link to the English interviews at La Voix du Livre

I interviewed Carina Rozenfeld and my blog twin Tom of La Voix du Livre interviewed CJ Daugherty.

Bonjour Carina, bienvenue à l’interview The Secret Fire pour Teen Librarian et La Voix du Livre ! Mon binôme blogueur Tom a interviewé CJ donc tu es mienne pour toute la durée de cette interview (insérer une voix menaçante). Je te présente mes excuses pour mes lacunes en français et j’espère que les poser en Anglais ne posera pas de problème.
Ma première question que je pose à tous les auteurs que j’interviewe pour le blog est de les inviter à se présenter aux lecteurs, peux-tu s’il te plaît nous dire quelques informations sur toi ?

Quelque chose à mon propos ? Alors, je suis une écrivaine française. J’ai écrit environ 20 livres en France, pour les enfants, les adolescents et les jeunes adultes. Je suis aussi la mère d’un adolescent qui étudie les arts appliqués. Je vis à Paris avec lui et mes chats, pas très loin de la Tour Eiffel…

Est-ce que The Secret Fire est ton premier roman à quatre mains ?

Oui, c’est la première fois que j’écris un roman avec quelqu’un d’autre. J’ai écrit environ 20 livres seule et c’est un beau changement et une super expérience de pouvoir explorer d’autres façons d’écrire.

Comment c’était de travailler avec CJ ? Quels ont été les plus grands challenges auxquels tu as dû faire face dans ce travail collaboratif ?

Travailler avec CJ, c’est génial, drôle et facile. Ça aurait pu être vraiment difficile, mais à la fin, on a trouvé une façon d’écrire ensemble qui a parfaitement fonctionné. La partie la plus difficile a été la langue, sans aucun doute. C’est déjà difficile de trouver sa propre voix, sa propre façon décrire dans sa langue natale, alors vous pouvez imaginer comment ça a été difficile en Anglais ! Mais CJ m’a beaucoup aidé. Merci à elle !

Quelle a été la meilleure partie de cette expérience d’écriture pour toi ?

J’adore (j’utilise le présent car on est en train d’écrire le tome 2 en ce moment même) qu’on puisse échanger nos idées. Et j’adore attendre les chapitres qu’elle m’envoie, car je suis alors à la place du lecteur, puis prendre celle de l’écrivain pour lui permettre d’être la lectrice. C’est très motivant.

Est-ce que vous avez établi un plan scénaristique, une frise chronologie, pour être sûr que vos personnages restaient sur la bonne voie tout au long de l’histoire ?

Pas vraiment. Dans le premier livre j’ai écrit les chapitres sur Sacha, et CJ ceux sur Taylor, alors on savait toujours où les personnages en étaient dans l’histoire. Mais de temps en temps on décidait ensemble ce qui allait se passer dans les chapitres suivants.

Comment avez-vous séparé les scènes d’écriture ? Je suppose que tu as écrit celles sur Sacha et CJ a travaillé sur Taylor (ou je me trompe ?) Mais quand ils se rencontrent, comment avez-vous fonctionné ?

Oui, j’ai écrit les parties sur Sacha et CJ celles sur Taylor. Quand ils sont ensemble ou discutent ensemble, alors, quand c’était mon chapitre par exemple, CJ était libre de changer des choses, pour aller plus dans la profondeur de la pensée de Taylor, pour être plus proche de son personnage, et inversement.
J’ai un peu honte de dire que j’ai une connaissance très limitée des livres non-anglophones en YA ; peux-tu nous recommander quelques auteurs européens de YA que tu aimes ?
Je ne suis pas surprise. La plupart des écrivains français ne sont pas traduits en anglais, alors n’ayez pas honte. C’est vraiment dommage parce qu’il y a beaucoup d’écrivains européens particulièrement bons. Je pense à Charlotte Bousquet, Samantha Bailly, Yves Grevet, Christophe Lambert, Victor Dixen qui sont français et Cindy Van Wilder qui est belge. Je pourrais encore en mentionner beaucoup. La littérature française est pleine de trésors.

Qu’est-ce que ce travail t’a apporté dans ta vie personnelle et dans ta vie professionnelle ?

C’est une expérience incroyable. Dans ma vie personne, j’ai une nouvelle amitié avec CJ et j’ai réalisé un rêve, celui de publier un livre en anglais, parce que mon frère vit en Amérique et ma belle-sœur et toute sa famille sont américains. Je suis ravie de savoir qu’ils vont finalement pouvoir lire un de mes livres. Dans ma vie professionnelle, je peux maintenant savoir ce que c’est d’être un auteur « anglais ». Les choses ne sont pas les mêmes : sa façon de travailler avec son editor/publisher (Ndt : en anglais, le mot n’est pas le même. L’editor est celui qui s’occupe du travail éditorial tandis que le publisher est celui qui publie le livre – c’est un poste plus logistique et directorial), la façon dont son livre voyage dans le monde parce qu’il est en anglais.

Est-ce que The Secret Fire est ton premier livre disponible en anglais ?

Oui, et j’ai beaucoup d’optimisme sur la suite, quelques éditeurs anglais seront peut-être intéressés de traduire mes autres livres après celui-ci !

Quelques uns de mes éditeurs français sont en relation avec mon éditeur anglais Atom Books. Peut-être que quelque chose se passera un jour ?

J’ai eu une longue période d’intérêt en l’alchimie durant mes penchants gothiques adolescents, alors j’aurais aimé savoir si vous avez fait des recherches sur l’alchimie pour cette histoire ?

La plupart des recherches ont été faites par CJ, parce que son personnage est plus concerné par l’alchimie. Mais j’ai lu quelques choses sur ce sujet.

Vous avez décidé d’écrire une histoire fantastique. Pourquoi cela était-il important pour vous ?

La plupart de mes romans ont une trame fantastique. Alors j’était familière de ce genre. CJ, elle, voulait faire une histoire plus fantastique et paranormale que Night School donc ce genre nous est venu assez naturellement.

Crois-tu que les alchimistes peuvent vraiment transformer des matières en une autre forme ?

En fait, en un sens, ne sommes-nous pas des alchimistes quand nous allumons la lumière dans nos maisons ? On transforme quelque chose, de l’énergie, de l’électricité, en lumière…

Que penses-tu de la magie ?

J’adore les bonnes histoires avec quelque chose de magique dans celles-ci. Et quand je vois un magicien, je suis toujours étonnée par ce qu’ils sont capables de faire, et je veux croire que c’est possible ! Peut-être que c’est pour ça que j’écris des histoires avec tant de fantastique : j’aimerais que tout cela comme la magie, les extraterrestres, avoir des ailes, être le Phénix puisse vraiment exister…

Si tu étais alchimiste, que ferais-tu de tes capacités ?

M’aider à travailler plus vite ? Trouver un moyen de voyager super vite, comme la téléportation ? Sentir le monde autour de moi de façon plus forte ?

Penses-tu que le réalisme magique de votre histoire peut aider le lecteur à considérer les vrais problèmes auquel un jeune adulte est confronté dans notre monde ?

Je lis beaucoup de YA et je pense que dans tous les livres, peu importe le genre (fantasy, paranormal, SF, réalisme…), on a toujours une certaine résonnance avec les problèmes des jeunes adultes : devenir un adulte avec des responsabilités, choisir quel genre d’adulte on aimerait devenir. La relation au monde, aux autres, aux parents, les capacités qu’on a pour construire la personne qu’on va devenir, comment faire face aux changements auxquels on va être confrontés, la réalité de la vie et de la mort…

Peux-tu nous donner quelques informations sur le tome 2 ?

Je n’en suis pas sûre… Mais peut-être que je peux vous dire que vous allez en apprendre plus sur les alchimistes, et que vous allez rencontrer des créatures encore plus terrifiantes.

Merci beaucoup d’avoir répondu à cette interview !

Some People Are Dangerous

Bonjour CJ, bienvenue sur La Voix du Livre pour l’interview sur The Secret Fire ! Mon binôme blogueur Matt a interviewé Carina (nous échangeons nos auteurs locaux) !

www.darrenbrade.comEst-ce que tu peux nous dévoiler quelque chose à propos de toi ?

Je suis une ancienne journaliste qui travaillait sur des meurtres et aujourd’hui j’écris des romans !

Est-ce que The Secret Fire est le premier roman que tu as écrit à quatre mains ?

Oui, j’ai écrit seule tous mes autres romans.

Comment c’était de travailler avec Carina ? Quels étaient les plus gros challenges ? Et quel a été le meilleur moment de cette expérience littéraire ?

C’était vraiment génial ! On se motivait mutuellement. Quand on a commencé à travailler sur The Secret Fire, on l’appelait « Le livre aux deux cerveaux ». On a décidé qu’il serait deux fois mieux que n’importe quel livre qu’on a écrits chacune de notre côté.
Ce qui a été le plus compliqué a été de décider comment nous allions procéder. Est-ce que nous devrions Skyper tous les jours ? Est-ce que nous devrions partager toutes nos idées avant de les écrire ? Mais finalement nous avons mis en place un système de chapitres alternés, et ça s’est bien mis en place.

Est-ce que vous aviez prévu ensemble la chronologie de l’histoire pour être sures que vos personnages restent sur la bonne voie durant tout le roman ?

Non, pas au début. On écrivait simplement les chapitres comme ils venaient. Mais quand l’intrigue s’est vraiment développée, c’est devenu nécessaire d’organiser la suite. Nous avons donc décidé ensemble de ce qui allait arriver et nous avons ensuite écrit le reste de nos chapitres. Et pour le second tome, nous avons un synopsis détaillé et nous essayons plus ou moins d’y rester fidèles.

Qu’est-ce que ce travail vous a apporté, dans votre vie professionnelle mais aussi personnelle ?

Ca a supprimé la solitude du travail d’écriture. J’avais un retour immédiat sur mon travail. J’envoyais un chapitre à Carina dans la matinée et elle me répondait le plus souvent dans les heures qui suivaient. Et j’adorais lire ses chapitres, c’était comme avoir un petit cadeau chaque jour.

Est-ce que vous avez dû effectuer beaucoup de recherche sur l’alchimie ?

ENORMEMENT. J’ai lu des traductions de livres d’alchimie du XVe siècle et j’ai étudié les inventions et l’imaginaire de l’alchimie. Et le titre de notre roman est emprunté à un célèbre texte du XVIe siècle sur l’alchimie.

Pourquoi est-ce que c’était important pour vous de créer une intrigue fantastique ?

Je n’avais jamais écrit de fantasy avant et j’avais envie de voir tout ce qu’on peut faire quand les lois de la physique ne s’appliquent plus à vos personnages et que vous pouvez aller au-delà des limites. Lorsque nous écrivons de la fantasy, nous ne somment pas limités.

Est-ce que vous croyez que les alchimistes pouvaient transformer une substance en une autre ?

C’est ce que nous faisons toute le temps à notre époque. Nous transformons le fer ou le minerai en acier, le plastique en tissus.
Et le plastic vient du pétrole. Quand on assemble deux molécules, on peut créer quelque chose de complètement différent. Associe le sodium et le chlorure, tu crées du sel de table. Notre monde est plein de transformations et les alchimistes étaient juste en avance sur leur temps. Après tout, l’alchimie c’est 90% de la science et seulement 10% de magie. Et est-ce que tu ne crois pas aux 10% de magie ?

Quel est ton point de vue sur la magie ?

J’aimerais être une sorcière, est-ce que c’est trop demander ?

Si tu avais des compétences en alchimie, qu’est-ce que tu aimerais faire ?

J’aimerais faire de belles choses, rendre les gens heureux, donner à mes amis tout ce qu’ils veulent. Et aussi, agrandir ma maison.

Est-ce que tu penses que le mélange de magie et de réalisme de votre roman peut aider les lecteurs à voir les problèmes réels auxquels les jeunes adultes sont confrontés dans le monde ?

Dans le roman, Sacha meurt alors qu’il vient juste d’avoir 18 ans. Je pense qu’il est juste de dire que quand on est jeunes, les 18 ans peuvent symboliser la fin de la jeunesse et le début intimidant d’une vie d’adulte. Ce livre parle du désir de survire à 18 ans et montre les incroyables possibilités qu’apporte le futur. Ce livre montre également à quel point la science peut être géniale. Donc, je contribue à ma manière pour éduquer les jeunes ?
Est-ce que vous avez le droit de nous donner quelques indices sur le deuxième tome ?

Le tome 2 commence trois semaines avant les 18 ans de Sacha. Ils sont sur le point de découvrir qui est le Dark practitioner et pourquoi il est passé de l’alchimie à la démonologie. Le temps file mais Taylor devient plus fort.

Est-ce que tu peux nous dire quels autres auteurs français et anglais de YA tu apprécies ?

Evidemment, je recommande tous les livres de Carina Rozenfeld, en particulier Phaenix, elle est une auteure formidable !
J’adore également Cindy Van Wilder, qui est belge mais qui écrit en français. Elle a par exemple écrit Les Héritiers et La reine des neiges.

Et dans les auteurs anglais ou américains, j’adore Holly Bourne (Am I Normal Yet ?), Mel Salisbury (The Sin Eater’s Daughter) et Cassandre Clare (The Mortal Instruments) et plein d’autres encore !

All my thanks go to Tom & his girlfriend for the rapid translation of these interviews from English into French!

Longbow Girl: Interview with Linda Davies


Hi Linda, welcome to Teen Librarian for the Eight Questions With… interview! The first question I ask all authors is: can you please introduce yourself to the audience?

Hi Matt and hi to all you lovely readers out there, so, who am I? Good question. I’m lots of different people depending on what novel I am writing (I get so into the book I do feel as if I am the main character and am living their lives!), but I suppose there’s an external consistency to who I am: I’m an Oxford University economist by training but a novelist by nature. I spent seven years working as an investment banker in London, New York and Eastern Europe, being exposed to more potential plots than was decent. Then I escaped and wrote my first book, Nest of Vipers. Longbow Girl is my twelfth book.

I’ve lived in various parts of the world.

I spent three years living in Peru and more recently eight years living in the Middle East. In 2005 my husband and I were kidnapped at sea by Iranian government forces and held hostage in Iran for two weeks before being released after high-level intervention by the British government. I wrote about that in my first non-fiction book, Hostage.

I am married and have three great children are who occasionally drive me mad but then they’d no doubt say the same about me. My family play a big part in my books. My husband reads various drafts aloud to the children and me, then they all give me their brutally honest opinion. I then slink away to try and write a better draft!

I also have two dogs, Rhodesian Ridgebacks called Boudicca and Beowulf, and a desert cat called Cutie. We live near the sea in Suffolk, where I try to swim all year round.

Longbow Girl is a thoroughly gripping tale set in the Wales of the modern era as well as the late Tudor period, how much research went into writing it?

Longbow-final-tweaks-bigger1One way and another, I’ve done a lot of research, both years ago and recently. The roots of Longbow Girl are very personal and go back to my own childhood. When I was eight years old, my father gave me a longbow for Christmas. I would shoot it for hours, perfecting my aim, practising until my hands were covered in calluses. My older brother, Kenneth, also had one. We would shoot cans off walls and also, rather terrifyingly, we’d aim for the high wires on the electricity pylons. Happily, we missed!

As a girl, I just wielded my longbow for fun, but I always used to feel different whenever I picked it up. Longbows are lethal weapons. They changed the course of history. This October sees the six hundredth anniversary of the Battle of Agincourt, an ‘unwinnable’ battle, won by the Longbow against all the odds. I did a lot of research into this and also the battle of Crécy in 1346, another ‘unwinnable’ battle won by the Anglo-Welsh longbowmen.

I didn’t really need to research the locations. The setting of Longbow Girl, in the Brecon Beacons and in the Black Mountains, was close to where I grew up. When I was a girl we would regularly go on forced family marches up Pen Y Fan in all weathers. I used to grit my teeth until we got to the top, and then run all the way down to the Storey Arms with my brothers. I never thought that I would write about it, but I love that journey back in my head to the mountains of my youth. It’s my very own form of time travel! I went back several times when I was writing Longbow Girl as well, just to see it all with fresh eyes. It’s such a beautiful and atmospheric part of the world. Revisiting was a joy and an inspiration.

The historical aspect of Longbow Girl took a lot of research. I read widely about the Tudor period, both in factual books but also via fiction. Sometimes it is fiction that gives you a much more vivid portrait of a time and place. Here is a photo of some of the books I’ve either read or repeatedly delved into for my research.
Linda's books
Are you a fan on the Mabinogion and are you able to recommend any particular translations of the text?

I am a huge fan of the Mabinogion. My father had a copy of the 1989 Everyman revised edition (translated by Gwyn Jones and Thomas Jones, one of whom signed it but with an illegible signature!) and he gave that copy to me over twenty years ago. I always had a sense even then that I would write something linked to it. Recently, my brother Roy gave me an Oxford University Press hardback Mabinogion published in 2007. It’s lovely but my late father’s copy will always be my favourite.

Linda and her longbowMuch like Merry, you grew up using a longbow, have you kept up proficiency in its use?

Absolutely I still have Huntress. If you have a look at my website:, you will see a video clip of me shooting arrows with Huntress. I practice every few weeks. I wish I could say I can consistently hit an empty can on a wall 50m away… but I’d be lying! I can consistently hit my standard archery target from 30m away and if I sneak a bit closer I can periodically get a bull’s-eye or what archers insist on calling the ‘gold’ at the centre of the target.

Are any parts of Longbow Girl based on actual historical events or have you just woven historical characters into a fictional setting?

Yes, they are! A particular historical fact that I discovered about six years ago acted as a catalyst to writing Longbow Girl. I learned that Henry VIII issued an edict ordering the destruction of wild Welsh ponies under a certain height in order to improve his stock of destriers, or war horses. I was outraged on their behalf! The other childhood inspiration for Longbow Girl was my own black Welsh Mountain Section B pony, Jacintha. I was horrified by the idea of her ancestors being hunted down and destroyed, just because they were small! I dreamt of being able to go back in time to rescue some of those ponies, and then I thought, what if a young girl did just that…

So I came up with the brave, strong and wonderful Merry – the fifteen-year-old heroine of Longbow Girl. She is a supreme archer, the first longbow girl in a tradition of longbow men that stretches back seven hundred years to the Battle of Crécy. She’s also a great rider. One day, while out on her pony Jacintha, Merry discovers a treasure that offers her the chance to turn back time. She travels back to the brutal kingdom of Henry V111. Fighting against battle-seasoned men, she has to wield her longbow to save her family. To save herself… and a few ponies too!

In a strange co-incidence, mirroring one of the central plot lines from Longbow Girl which I dreamed up over five years ago, I recently discovered that in 1346 the Longbowmen of Llantrisant (the village right next to where I grew up!) fought for the Black Prince at the Battle of Crécy and saved his life.

The grateful Prince granted them a piece of land to be held in perpetuity. To this day, nearly seven hundred years later, the direct descendants of those longbowmen hold that parcel of land in Llantrisant.

Here’s another personal link that goes all the way back to the Battle of Crécy. During the battle, the Black Prince claimed the emblem of the defeated Bohemian King: three ostrich feathers. This emblem has been adopted by every Prince of Wales since. I was given a ‘Royal’ ring bearing the crest with the three ostrich feathers when I was a little girl when our current Prince Charles was invested as Prince of Wales. My father was involved in the Investiture and gave me the ring to mark the occasion. I still wear it now! I have never taken it off.

Have you ever read The Gauntlet by Ronald Welch? I read it about 25 years ago now, Longbow Girl reminded me a bit of it as they share a slightly similar time-slip plot and it is also set in Wales.

I’ve never come across it till now. It sounds intriguing! I’ve just ordered it.

Although the main storyline was tied up there were a couple of plot threads dangling at the end – do you have any sequels planned?

There are a few dangling threads aren’t there…? And yes I would dearly love to write a couple of sequels exploring what and where Merry goes next. I’ve just started plotting a different book, also Y/A/middle grade and will write that one first.

I am also a big fan of your Djinn books and reviewed the first two back in 2009 & 2010, moving away from Longbow Girl for just a moment can you let me know when Djinn War is due out?

Thank you so much! I am delighted to hear that. War of the Djinn is currently filed away, both in my brain and on my PC. I have done some work on it and hope to reprise it one day. At the moment, the wonderful Tanabi Films is deep in the process of putting together a deal to make an animated movie of Sea Djinn and then hopefully the rest of the Djinn books after that, so watch this space!

Thank you so much for giving up your time!

Is my absolute pleasure Matt. Thank you for your interest in my books and for your support and kind words.

All Sorts of Possible Blog Tour: Blurred lines between reality and magic – Why have this element in your stories?

All Sorts of Possible COVERI have only written two novels so it’s difficult to say precisely what sort of writer I am. Furthermore, who knows what I’ll end up writing next. But it is true to say that in my first two books I have grafted the magical and the supernatural onto the real world in which both stories take place. I’m not entirely sure why this is because it’s just been a natural process of storytelling for me, but I’ll have a go at trying to give you some reasons as to why I think it might be.

Certainly I have always been a bit of a daydreamer, a person who likes to imagine ‘what if’ and escape the confines of the real world in which we live. It has therefore seemed a logical step to do this in my writing too, where a blank page gives me the opportunity to imagine anything I want to and make it come alive with words. I have also been a big observer of people too, making me slightly detached from the real world. Perhaps a combination of these two traits adds a twist to the stories I try and write?

Or perhaps it’s just because I’m lazy, that I can’t be bothered to world build a huge alternative universe so I just take a few magical elements and graft them onto the ordinary world that I know and can describe. Or maybe it’s down to the things that I have read that influence my writing. For example I like poetry and this can be quite hyper real or even surreal sometimes, using heightened, powerful language as a lens through which to view the world. (I often think of reading poetry like looking through a child’s kaleidoscope and seeing lots of different things at once, such can be the power of the words sometimes). It could be that I haven’t really grown up and that my inner child is still quite strong and influencing the way I write, infusing it with a slightly magical view of the world.

I don’t seem to be very good at pinning this down!

So perhaps I should try a different approach and look elsewhere for an answer. After all whatever there is in my personal make up that makes me put the real and the magical together does not really make me unique because there are lots of writers who write novels in a similar vein, who write stories in ways that put a unique spin on the world we know. Some people define it as magical realism whilst others don’t. Regardless of what label to use, this type of writing seems to be a genre defined by the fact that it is quite difficult to define, flirting as it does with various other genres and where anything is possible in the story, limited only by a writer’s imagination.

Another notable trait of this form of storytelling is that to enable the magical element to resonate the normal world has to feel very real too. So magical realist writers, whilst being imaginative and off kilter, have to be very gritty realists as well, showing us the real world in a finely tuned manner. I think this realism is one of the key strengths of this type of work.

However, I think the best way to portray magical realism is by describing the feeling it engenders when read, namely a vague dislocation of normality, a slightly skewed vision of the world that can make a reader giddy, putting them off balance. In other words, books of this type can be constantly surprising.

So why is it such a popular genre for writers (me included) to work in? Well, I think it might be because writers are explorers, weighing up what they have been told about the world (what their brains have stored up through childhood, adolescence and beyond) and how it functions. Through the process of storytelling they are working things out for themselves about life without necessarily drawing conclusions.

For example, David Almond, whose work is often described as magical realism, talks a lot about the impact of his Catholic upbringing in many of the interviews I have read, and he is aware of how wrestling with it has impacted on his writing, namely that of negotiating the tension between rational and magical thinking, of what to believe:

When you are at a limit, you pray. At the end of rationalism that’s what’s left. My work explores the frontier between rationalism and superstition and the wavering boundary between the two.

This idea that writers are working things out for themselves may be one reason why magical realism is popular in YA and also MG. Children and adolescents usually accept they don’t know everything about the world and are in the process of trying to work it all out too. There is, perhaps, a sense of collaboration between these readers and magical realist writers within the arena of storytelling. I like to think those adults who read magical realism – whether YA, MG or the literary stuff for grown ups – are ones who still have enough sense to realize they don’t know everything about the world either, that they aren’t overpowered by hubris.

So I think magical realism is a powerful tool for exploring and feeling one’s way in the world, allowing the reader and the writer the freedom to react to the odd, the strange, and the downright mysterious. I like to think this is one reason for why I have written the books I have so far. But I can think of another reason too.

One further spin off from this genre is that readers’ imaginations are given a work out. I know from my own experiences of writing that creativity is a muscle – it needs to be inspired to grow stronger – and if books that fuse the magical, the fantastical and the mysterious with the real help to inspire and fuel creativity in other people then that has to be a good thing. Maybe that’s the real reason I write the way that I do, to inspire readers and make them think and question and imagine for themselves…?

Rupert Wallis

Stuff Mom Never Told You: Judy Blume Forever

For the past several months I have been listening to the phenomenal Stuff Mom Never told You

“What is that?” you may well ask, the website explains it far more succinctly that I ever could!

Hosted by Cristen Conger and Caroline Ervin, Stuff Mom Never Told You is the audio podcast from HowStuffWorks that gets down to the business of being women from every imaginable angle. Fueled by boundless curiosity and rigorous research, Cristen and Caroline are girls-next-door gender experts who skillfully decode the biology, psychology and sociology of ladies and gents, from their evolutionary past to millennial present, to better understand all the Stuff Mom Never Told You.
(taken from

One of their recent podcasts is called Judy Blume Forever a celebration of the awesomeness that is Judy Blume – one of the greatest writers for children, young people and, well everyone actually!

Judy Blume will be at the Manchester Central Library this evening – in conversation with brillaint UK author Keris Stainton and will also be popping up around the UK – check out her UK tour details here:

If you cannot make any of those appearances, heck even if you can and want to find out more about JB then take a listen to Judy Blume Forever here:

Episode Summary
One of the most beloved and banned authors, Judy Blume wrote adolescence like no other. Cristen and Caroline investigate how Judy Blume’s real life intersected with her fictional books, censorship activism and feminism.

Eight Questions With… Esther Ehrlich

Hi Esther, welcome to the Eight Questions With… interview for Teen Librarian:

The first question I generally ask is for authors to introduce themselves to the audience- who they are, where they come from and so on, if you wouldn’t mind?

My pleasure! So, right now I’m sitting at my desk, looking into the branches of the oak trees right outside my window in Wildcat Canyon in the San Francisco Bay Area, where I live with my family. I like it here, but I miss the east coast, which is where I was born and raised. NEST takes place on Cape Cod, and I really enjoyed hanging out there in my imagination—dunes and swimming ponds and salt marsh—while I was writing the book.

Nest is your debut novel and a thoroughly enjoyable read! Can you let me know what inspired you to write it?

Hmmm…There are so many answers to that question! In a way, I feel like everything I’ve ever experienced in my life filters through me and shapes my writing. What’s true is NEST began with an image that came to me and captured my attention—two sisters dancing together in the road in a summer rainstorm while their mother, a dancer who wasn’t feeling well, watched them from the porch. I wrote that scene and the rest of the story unfolded from there.

Did you set out to write specifically for younger readers or do you write for yourself and hope that your work finds an audience?

Honestly, I wrote the book that I wanted to write, not even thinking about an audience. It was other professionals in the book world who decided what niche NEST fit into. I’m glad that younger readers and adults seem to be really enjoying the book.

What is the most rewarding part of the writing experience for you?

I love discovering who my characters are. There’s a kind of careful listening that I have to do: What hints are my characters throwing in my direction? If I pay careful attention, I find out what matters to them. Over time, I get to know them really well, and that’s so gratifying.

I also just love words—the sounds and rhythms, and, of course, meanings. I like stringing them together and creating something new. It’s deeply satisfying.

Do you read the works of other writers for children and young people? If yes, can you give some recommendations?

Let’s see. I love The Pictures of Hollis Woods. Counting by Sevens. The One and Only Ivan. Okay, for Now. As a child, The Secret Garden was one of my favorite books. Charlotte’s Web. Stuart Little. The Trumpet of the Swan. I’d strongly recommend all of these to everyone. I recently read All the Bright Places and thought it was wonderful. Without Tess is another beauty. These last two, I’d recommend for teenagers and adults.

Which books would you recommend for readers who enjoyed Nest?

All of the above!

Are you currently working on anything new, or do you have any new books planned?

Stay tuned…

You are based in USA so visiting schools and reading groups in the UK may be a bit difficult but do you ever do Skype visits to international groups that are interested in meeting you?

I haven’t done Skype visits yet, but I’d like to give it a whirl! Also, I’d be thrilled to visit the UK. I’ve never been “across the pond!”

Thank you so much for giving up your time to answer these questions!

Thanks for your interest in me and NEST!

NEST publishes in the UK on 2nd July (Rock The Boat, £7.99).

Follow Esther on Facebook and Twitter: @EstherEhrlich

Eight Questions With… A.J. Steiger

Hi A.J. welcome to the Eight Questions With… interview for Teen Librarian

The first question I generally ask is for authors to introduce themselves to the audience- who they are, where they come from and so on if you wouldn’t mind?

Hi, I’m A.J. Steiger, and I live in Illinois. I’m a writer and freelance transcriptionist. My work keeps me in front of the computer a lot, so I try to get out into nature sometimes to remind myself that the world is more than words and screens. Mindwalker is my first young adult novel, and it’s out now with OneWorld Publications, and also with Knopf in the U.S.

Mindwalker is your first novel, can you give us an idea of what it is about and what inspired you to write it?

Mindwalker is set in a future where people can choose to have painful memories removed. Seventeen-year-old Lain Fisher is a prodigy who’s already skilled at wiping away her patients’ traumas. A troubled classmate asks her to erase a horrific childhood experience from his mind, and while exploring his memories, she learns that he’s connected to something much bigger…something their government doesn’t want the world to discover.

I’ve always found the idea of memory modification to be a fascinating and disturbing concept. There’s a quote from Gregory Maguire that sums it up well: “Memory is a part of the present. It builds us up inside; it knits our bones to our muscles and keeps our hearts pumping. It is memory that reminds our bodies to work, and memory that reminds our spirits to work too: it keeps us who we are.”

If you change someone’s memories, you change their identity. It’s the ultimate power over an individual. It could be used for good—to help people overcome horrors like war, abuse, and assault—but it could very easily go wrong, especially if institutions gain the power to control which facts people remember and which ones they forget.
Mindwalker is also a novel about mental illness and the social stigma that often goes along with it, which I think is a hugely important issue.

Dystopian novels seem to have an enduring popularity, especially amongst young adult readers, what do you think the reason for this is?

The world is already pretty scary. Transforming our fears into fiction gives us a sense of control and reminds us that there are things we can do about the situation we’re living in.

I think young readers especially like these books because they often involve themes of rebellion or bucking the system. When you’re young, the universe hasn’t had time to wear you down and make you cynical and complacent, so there’s still this burning fire to tackle injustice, and that’s a wonderful thing.

There’s a danger of sliding into escapism, though. If we satisfy our need for rebellion vicariously, through movies and books, it can take the edge off our hunger for real change. So I think a good dystopian ought to leave you at least a little bit nervous. Truth and justice doesn’t always win—it doesn’t happen automatically. You have to keep fighting for it.

Mindwalker has been compared favourably to The Giver by Lois Lowry – have you ever read it and do you read novels by other YA writers? If yes would you be able to recommend some authors and titles?

I first read The Giver as a teenager, and it left an impression on me. Its world seems very safe and civilized and pleasant on the surface, but once you peel back the outer layers you see the darkness underneath, and to me that makes it more interesting than a world where everything is blatantly horrible. Real horror doesn’t always advertise itself.

I’ve also read more current YA fiction like The Hunger Games and Marie Lu’s Legend series, and I enjoyed all of those. But my favourite YA novels tend to be brooding, introspective stories like The Adoration of Jenna Fox.

Did you set out to write specifically for teenagers or do you write for yourself and hope that your work finds an audience?

I think all writers have to strike a balance between writing for themselves and writing for an audience. I originally conceived of Mindwalker as a science fiction story for adults, with adult characters. But in the process of writing, I decided to make it YA, and something clicked.

What is the most rewarding part of the writing experience for you?

Revision. Apparently, many writers hate editing, but for me it’s a lot of fun. Writing the rough draft is kind of like generating the raw clay—it’s messy, lumpy and unfinished—and once you have enough of that clay, you can start shaping it and playing with it and seeing it really become what it’s supposed to be. That’s a very exciting feeling.

Of course, I also love getting feedback. Writing is fundamentally an act of communication. Without readers, the experience is incomplete.

What is coming next after Mindwalker?

I’m currently working on the sequel, Mindstormer. After that, we’ll see. I’ll probably continue to write young adult fiction, though I’d like to try branching out into different genres, like fantasy.

You are based in the US so visiting schools and reading groups in the UK may be a bit difficult but do you ever do Skype visits to international groups that are interested in meeting you?

I haven’t yet, but that could be a possibility for the future.

Thank you so much for giving up your time to answer these questions!

Mindwalker is published by Rock the Boat and is available now