Category Archives: Resources

Empathy Day

Society faces an empathy crisis. But research shows that 98% of us can improve our empathy skills and that in books we have a hugely practical tool. This collection can play a powerful role in helping raise a generation of empathic citizens, story by story.

Miranda McKearney, EmpathyLab’s founder

The 2020 #ReadforEmpathy Book Collections from @EmpathyLabUK are announced today and feature 50 superb books; 33 for 4-11 year olds and 17 for 12-16 year olds. 

All the books from both the primary and secondary collections

Some illuminate the experience of people from a range of cultures or life circumstances. Others help children explore emotions, so they can understand how other people feel. Several reflect stories of our time, such as the refugee experience, or coping with anxiety. All are engaging and thought provoking.

The collections are available to order from Peters via https://www.peters.co.uk/empathy2020 or can be purchased from your local independent bookshop. Click https://www.booksellers.org.uk/bookshopsearch to find your nearest shop.

Each collection has its own Read for Empathy Guide with a synopsis of all of the books, top tips for sharing stories and more information about #EmpathyDay which is on 9 June 2020. 

Teachers, librarians, parents – download your FREE guides by visiting https://www.empathylab.uk/2020-read-for-empathy-collections

Resources for International Holocaust Memorial Day

International Holocaust Memorial Day takes place on the 27th January, this date is the anniversary of the liberation of the liberation of Auschwitz-Birkenau. This year (2020) marks 75 years since this happened. It is also the 25th anniversary of the Genocide in Bosnia.

If you want to set up a display or run events to mark this date you still have time to put something together. Below is a list of links to resources you can download and use in your library:

https://www.hmd.org.uk/resources/ – the official site of Holocaust Memorial Day UK, you are able to download packs, you can also request physical packs if you are in the UK.

https://www.wienerlibrary.co.uk/Learning The Wiener Holocaust Library is one of the world’s leading and most extensive archives on the Holocaust and Nazi era.

https://www.yadvashem.org/education.html Yad Vashem is the World Holocaust Remembrance Center, is the ultimate source for Holocaust education, documentation and research.

https://www.ushmm.org/ The US Holocaust Memorial Museum

https://www.annefrank.org/en/education/ Anne Frank House is an independent non-profit organisation that runs a museum in the house where Anne Frank went into hiding.

https://www.facinghistory.org/topics/genocide-mass-violence Facing History helps students connect choices made in the past to those they will confront in their own lives

https://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/the-holocaust This Holocaust site produced under the auspices of the American-Israeli Cooperative Enterprise offers all the tools necessary to provoke students and teachers alike to undertake a meaningful investigation of the Holocaust.

http://auschwitz.org/en/ the website of the memorial and museum at Auschwitz-Birkenau

Comic Scene

Tony from Comic Scene kindly sent me copies of the first six months of this new magazine to have a look at, and I asked if he’d like to do an introductory post for the blog. Not only has he written a blurb about the fascinating range of articles, as well as reviews and original comic strips, he has also very generously included a special offer and prize draw for librarians who would like to encourage wider reading of comics and graphic novels, see below!

ComicScene Magazine is a new magazine which guides librarians, adults and children to what classic and contemporary comics to try, and what graphic novels from U.K., US and European publishers people should be reading.  It also introduces you to the exciting and eclectic work of independent and small press comics.  For those who love superhero movies and TV shows they go back to the original comic source of the films and TV.  Many of the original comics inspiring films, such as the Avengers, are over 30 to 40 years old, so a rich source of material to explore.  Did you also know publishers like Rebellion are publishing new Roy of the Rovers comics and bringing back girls comics like Tammy, Jinty & Misty? Comic Fans love the magazine – but the main aim of the title is to help those parents/carers who casually read boys and girls comics when they were younger to revist old friends or recommend comics to their children and grandchildren.   From the current issue they have also introduced some of the best comic strips being produced today with plans for a dedicated pull out comic section for adults to give to their children to encourage reading and improve literacy.  It’s the only monthly magazine dedicated to comics and comic culture being published today in the U.K. and Ireland and we’d recommend it as your guide. The magazine is available to buy in selected WHSmiths, McColls and Easons in Ireland, and it can be ordered in any newsagent or comic shop.  Just pop your postcode into the shop finder to check what local stores stock the magazine. Libraries can also subscribe monthly to the magazine or subscribe in print or digital from £2.50 a copy digital or £5.50 in print (with free digital copy).

On the ComicScene shop they have just added the first six months of the magazine in a £30 pack and if a library purchases a pack and/or subscribes before the end of July they will be put in a draw to get their subscription back for the year PLUS £100 of free Graphic Novels (email comicsceneuk@gmail.com when you have made your order).

With sales of graphic novels for children on the rise and University courses now available to study producing comics and comic history who knows – you could be inspiring the next comic writer or artist by introducing the magazine to your library!

gal-dem manifesto

This is the manifesto that the gal-dem contributors created when putting together their powerful book of essays “I will not be erased”, a collection of stories based on diaries and letters from their teen years, full of understanding and advice they wish they could share with their younger selves. Rules to live your life by!

I shared “I will not be erased” on the blog last week, after being sent a review copy

How Not to Lose It

April has been Stress Awareness Month in the UK, soI thought I’d share with you this book for teenagers about looking after their mental health that I was sent earlier this year by Scholastic

How Not to Lose it, written by Anna Williamson and illustrated by Sophie Beer

Anna Williamson is a TV presenter and has written for adults, as well as being an ambassador and national spokesperson for Mind, The Prince’s Trust, and Childline, and working as a counsellor for children and young people.

contents page

The book covers lots of issues that will affect the emotional and mental health of most teenagers: including school, families, friendships, sex and sexuality, and the dreaded puberty, and things that can be affected: such as body image, self-esteem, and fears. To make the book accessible it is set out really nicely with illustrations by Sophie Beer, and it includes some real actions that readers can take to improve situations.

Toxic friendship is well covered in the ‘Just be You’ chapter

There are also some other brilliant mental health books for teenagers around at the moment (not to mention the excellent fiction dealing with mental health issues, or simply the fact that reading a book is good for you…). I’m also a fan of the Usborne Looking After Your Mental Health book, and Nicola Morgan has written lots about it, for teens and their grownups!

The Library 100

What makes a novel “great”? At OCLC, they believe literary greatness can be measured by how many libraries have a copy on their shelves.

The OCLC has compiled a list of the 100 most commonly held novels in Libraries using data from WorldCat.

Follow this link to find out more:https://www.oclc.org/en/worldcat/library100.html

Passive Programming Idea: Jokes in a Mug

A passive programme that I have found to be very successful is setting out a mug containing jokes on the service desk.

It has been attracting library patrons of all ages and has a dedicated band of followers who now come in on a regular basis just to pick up a joke.

If you are interested in testing it out, all you need is a mug/cup and a discrete sign advertising hat is on offer. You can collect a range of jokes and reuse them as statistically people would grab a different joke each time.

For those of you who may not have the time to hunt down jokes suitable for all ages I have a selection available to download below.

Jokes

Space and science fiction jokes

One Liners

Feeling crafty?

SearchPress publish loads of amazing arts and crafts books, for beginning projects up to daunting expertise, and they very kindly offered to share a couple of free projects with us to entice you to their website. I know lots of libraries run or host craft sessions, and you will definitely have some manga fans, so have a look for some inspiration…

From Crocheted Cactuses comes this really cute (but baffling to a non-crochet-er) plan for, you guessed it, a crocheted cactus!

They have loads of manga titles, but the pages they’ve shared with us are from How to Draw Manga (in simple steps) by Yishan Li:

There are other free projects available on their website too!

General Election 2017 Display Resources

As you all know we have a snap General Election on the way on the 8th June, I am currently working on some resources for my students. The first three are posters that you can download below by clocking on the images and saving the A3 .pdf files that they link to. Other materials will be uploaded here once they are ready.

Read the Movie / Watch the Book Display Materials

As Oscars Season is just round the corner I have put together some resources to aid library staff in schools and public libraries to put together a display of books that have been adapted into movies. An A4 colour Oscar Reading poster and five A3 pages of books for children and young people that have been adapted for the silver screen in film strips.

Download (PDF, 111KB)

Download (PDF, 1.83MB)

If anyone would like to create their own filmstrips with book covers you can download the transparent film strip here: