Author Archives: Matt Imrie

Teen Librarian Newsletter

The latest issue of the Teen Librarian Newsletter is now available to read online here:

https://mailchi.mp/96ee2aeba9ba/teen-librarian-newsletter

Welcome to the Neighborhood Library: a Fred Rogers Display

In November, the film A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood starring Tom Hanks as Fred Rogers will be released.

Thinking about this sparked the idea for a Fred Rogers display in the library.

The idea itself is very simple, the backdrop could be an image of the set from Mister Rogers’ Neighbourhood, props are optional but a folded red sweater and a pair of sneakers should suffice as well as DVDs and CDs of the show and a selection of books by and about Fred Rogers and his creations.

The sweater and sneakers can be borrowed from colleagues or sourced from a thrift store/charity shop and are not strictly speaking necessry but would be eye-catching and recognizable to fans of the show.

The set image can be downloaded here:

A list of books by Fred Rogers can be seen here: http://www.neighborhoodarchive.com/publications/

A list of current and forthcoming Daniel Tiger Books is available here: https://www.simonandschuster.net/series/Daniel-Tigers-Neighborhood

Other books by and about Fred Rogers:

  • A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood by Fred Rogers & Luke Flowers (Quirk Books)
  • The Good Neighbor: the Life and Words of Fred Rogers by Maxwell King (Harry N. Abrams Books)
  • Who Was Mister Rogers? by Diane Bailey (Penguin Workshop)
  • Mister Rogers’ Neighbourhood: a Visual History by Fred Roges Productions (Clarkson Potter) published in October 2019

DVDs:

A list of Daniel Tiger’s Neighborhood is available here

As with any lists these are not meant to be exhaustive and are merely examples fo what my exist in library collections.

Live-action Warhammer 40K TV Series

The news popped up this morning on a Whatsapp group in South Africa, my friends were geeking out about the news that Games Workshop and Big Light Productions had landed Frank”The Man in the High Castle” Spotnitz as show-runner and Executive Producer on a forthcoming live-action Warhammer 40K television series.

I have been a fan of the Warhammer 40K Universe for quite some time! Mostly thanks to picking up a copy of Necropolis by Dan Abnett in a charity shop on the Sidcup high street in 2003. After devouring that I hunted down the other Gaunt‘s Ghosts books that were in print back then and then discovered the Eisenhorn trilogy (also by Abnett).

It is around Eisenhorn that the live-action series is being planned.

Now if you don’t know anything about Warhammer, the first thing you should know is:

It is the 41st Millennium. For more than a hundred centuries the Emperor of Mankind has sat immobile on the Golden Throne of Earth. He is the master of mankind by the will of the gods and master of a million worlds by the might of His inexhaustible armies. He is a rotting carcass writhing invisibly with power from the Dark Age of Technology. He is the Carrion Lord of the vast Imperium of Man for whom a thousand souls are sacrificed every day so that He may never truly die…

Eisenhorn is an Inquisitor – one of the people that goes out amongst the stars to meet new species and annihilate them as well as searching for traitors, heretics, mutants, psykers and anyone else who may be an enemy of humanity. It is a big universe and the place is just filled with enemies.

I have high hopes for this series!

You can read the full press release here:

https://www.warhammer-community.com/press_releases/games-workshop-and-frank-spotnitz-to-create-live-action-warhammer-40000-tv-series/

Interactive Display: One Small Step for Man

Moon Landing Display

Ahead of the 50th anniversary of the Moon Landing next weekend I put together an interactive display around the historic moment.

Kids are able to measure their foot against Neil Armstrong’s 9.5 moon boot size.

If you are interested in putting together your own display you can download the materials in US and UK formats below.

You can download an image of the Moon for the backdrop from NASA here

American Letter size


Download (PDF, 1.1MB)

Download (PDF, 38KB)

UK A4 size

Download (PDF, 1.1MB)

Download (PDF, 38KB)

Teen Librarian Newsletter

The first issue of the all-new TeenLibrarian Newsletter is now available to read here: TeenLibrarian Newsletter

Every Child has the Right to… The Children’s Laureate Charter

By now you should have heard that Cressida “How to Train Your Dragon” Cowell has been appointed as the Waterstones Children’s Laureate for 2019-2021.

Not content to just take up the reins, she has hit the ground running, with the announcement of the Children’s Laureate Charter.

This ambitious list forms the blueprint for her two years as Laureate, and is one that sees her drawing from Pennac’s Rights of the Reader, the campaign to save libraries and from further afield – calling for creative subjects to be retained as well as fighting to save our increasingly imperilled planet.

Championing the rights of young people in literature and beyond is no small task and I am sure that like me you will be supporting and amplifying her efforts in encouraging young people to read and gain agency in their literaery choices and beyond!

Congratulations on becoming Children’s Laureate Cressida! I will support you in any way that I can!

Cressida Cowell Announced as New Waterstones Children’s Laureate

Books are transformative because of their unique ability to develop three key magical powers: intelligence, creativity and, most important of all, empathy. Words are power; let’s take magic seriously.

Cressida Cowell, Waterstones Children’s Laureate

http://www.childrenslaureate.org.uk/

Tuesday 9 July, London: Cressida Cowell, the international bestselling author and illustrator of theHow to Train Your Dragon and The Wizards of Once series and the author of the Emily Brown picture books all published by Hachette Children’s Group has today been crowned the Waterstones Children’s Laureate 2019–2021.

Cowell was presented with the iconic silver Laureate medal by the outgoing Waterstones Children’s Laureate, Lauren Child, at a ceremony at Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre, London.

This year marks the 20th anniversary of the Waterstones Children’s Laureate, awarded once every two years to an eminent children’s author or illustrator to honour outstanding achievement in their field. The ‘League of Laureates’ – including Quentin Blake, Malorie Blackman and Jacqueline Wilson – are the foremost representatives of children’s literature, showcasing the extraordinary and dynamic art form and its rich contribution to UK culture.

Managed by BookTrust, the UK’s largest children’s reading charity, and sponsored by Waterstones, each Laureate brings their own passion to the prestigious role to create a unique legacy. Today, the new Laureate unveiled the Cressida Cowell Waterstones Children’s Laureate Charter, a ‘giant to-do list’ to help ensure that books and reading are available to absolutely everyone. The charter asserts that every child has the right to:

  1. Read for the joy of it
  2. Access NEW books in schools, libraries and bookshops
  3. Have advice from a trained librarian or bookseller
  4. Own their OWN book
  5. See themselves reflected in a book
  6. Be read aloud to
  7. Have some choice in what they read
  8. Be creative for at least 15 minutes a week
  9. See an author event at least ONCE
  10. Have a planet to read on

At the ceremony, Cowell spoke about the importance of school libraries and her plans to campaign for these to be made statutory, and, along with public libraries and librarians, funded properly. Cowell also spoke about helping to develop children’s creative intelligence in the context of the cultural industries and the value they add to the UK economy and beyond, arguing for creative space on the curriculum.

Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark

Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark is a trilogy of books containing a mixture of urban myths and folklore that were compiled by author Alvin Schwartz and illustrated by Caldecott-winning illustrator Stephen Gammell.

Scary Stories to tell in the Dark

The stories and artwork terrified a generation of readers from 1981 to 1991. The books also muscled their way to the front of the ALA’s 100 most frequently challenged books for 1990-1991 and hit seventh place in the 2000-2009 frequently challenged list. The challenges were often down to the violence of the stories as well as the ” surreal, nightmarish illustrations” in the original books.

On August 9th, a film adaptation produced by horror-maestro Guillermo del Toro will be released by Lionsgate and CBS Films.

Ahead of the movie’s release, Harper Collins is re-releasing the books with the original illustrations: https://www.harpercollins.com/9780062961280/scary-stories-to-tell-in-the-dark-movie-tie-in-edition/

The movie and books release in August will be a perfect centre for a display along the lines of Tales to Chill the Warmest Months… featuring urban myths and horror stories for younger readers.

If you have never heard of or read Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark then now is the perfect time to change that. These books are phenomenal and the stories are sure to chill the blood of all who read them!

Library Workers share Concerns with CILIP Employer Partnerships

A group of Library Workers have written an open letter to CILIP‘s Board of Trustees regarding concerns about CILIP’s Employer Partnership Scheme, particularly their recent announcements of partnerships with GLL and the Ministry of Defence.

You can read the letter here

If you wish to add your name to the letter you can send an e-mail to: openlettertoCILIP@protonmail.com

Melvil Dewey, “Father of Modern Librarianship” and racist creep

Melvil Dewey’s name is most often associated with Librarianship due to the Decimal Classification System that carries his name.

But did you know that he also championed spelling reform, and was an early promoter of winter sports.

As Melvil Dui (spelling reform) he was one of the founders of the American Library Association.

Less well-known was his persistant sexual harassment of women – his unwelcome hugging, unwelcome touching, certainly unwelcome kissing  were noted by biographer Wayne A. Wiegand.

When he opened the School of Library Economy at Columbia College he requested a photograph of each female applicant due to his belief that “you cannot polish a pumpkin”.

Then there were his racist and anti-semitic views, at the Lake Placid Club, a place where Dewey envisioned educators finding health, strength and inspiration at modest cost; he banned African-Americans, Jews and others from membership.

Many people at this point may think that his views were common and accepted at this time but they contributed to a petition demanding Dewey’s removal as State Librarian because of his personal involvement in the Lake Placid Club’s policies, this led to a rebuke by the New York State Board of Regents causing him to resign.

He was later forced out of active mebership of the American Library Association after he made physical advances on several members of the ALA during a cruise to Alaska.

In 1930 he was sued for sexual harrassment by a former secretary that cost him over $2000 to settle out of court.

At the 2019 ALA Annual Conference his name was stripped from the Melvil Dewey Medal – awarded for creative leadership of high order, particularly in those fields in which Melvil Dewey was actively interested: library management, library training, cataloging and classification, and the tools and techniques of librarianship.

Find out more about Melvil Dewey here:

https://www.stuffmomnevertoldyou.com/podcasts/librarians-part-1.htm

https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1905/02/15/101408654.pdf

https://www.latimes.com/books/la-et-jc-dewey-name-removed-library-association-20190626-story.html