Category Archives: Libraries

Library A to Z

libraryaz
The launch of the Library A to Z will happen during the week 17th – 22nd November. Packs including copies of books and other materials will be sent to local, national and international politicians.

The aim of this action is to highlight the continued importance and value of library services, to encourage continued investment.

What is the Library A to Z you may ask… well it is a campaign created by librarian Gary Green, researcher Andrew Walsh and artist Jose Filhol to highlight the breadth of services, resources and facilities available, and celebrate the importance, value and relevance of well-funded and professionally-run public libraries.

It is this A to Z that has turned into the illustrations and promotional and advocacy material that is freely available for use on this site. The services, along with the words that have been turned into the illustrated letters, aren’t comprehensive, but are just a representative sample.

From

az1library
 
 
is for access; advice; answers; archives; art (view public art and sometimes borrow it too!); astronomy (some libraries loan out telescopes for stargazing); audio books; author events.
white barrier
to

az2library
 
 
 
 
is for ‘zines (magazines); zzzzz (child sleeping after being read bedtime story).
 
 
 

white barrier
Find out all about the project here:

http://www.libraryatoz.org/

The Rather Amazing Race: Introducing Students to Finding Information Quickly

Telling students that finding information in a book can be faster than using the internet is fun!

I told a class of year nines this morning and I could see the naked disbelief in their faces. The moment the words left my mouth a sea of hands shot up and a clamour of voices stridently disagreeing with me filled the library.

They shouted that the internet was faster, easier and had more accurate sources. I managed to quieten them down and then one lad stood up and said that he would show me that using the internet was faster. I asked him how he would accomplish this and he challenged me to a race.

He said that he would use the internet and I would use the books in the library. The rest of the class cheered loudly at this.

I was rather surprised, as I had been planning on running a books versus the internet lesson in October so I agreed. I suggested that we both stand in the centre of the library and said that the first person to take the information they found to their form tutor who was also in the library would win. I also gave him the choice of subject.

He said one word: “Football!”

He ran to the closest available computer while I walked over to World Book Encyclopedia, took Volume 7 (F) off the shelf and looked up Football. World Book is an American publication, so the information contained therein was about American Football, but it did reference Soccer (Association football). So I grabbed Volume 18 (So-Sz) found the entry on Soccer and took it to the teacher.

By the time my worthy opponent had started shouting that the computer was too slow, so I called him back to the rest of the class who started accusing me of cheating. I disagreed with them but that only made their fury greater, they told me that it was not fair and that I knew where all the information books in the library were and could just walk to them and find the information I wanted.

At this point I gave a silent thank you to whoever was listening and then agreed with the students.

The point of the exercise I told them, was not to show off what I can do in the library, but rather to show them what they can learn to do. The point of library lessons for year nine is to continue helping them learn how to find relevant and reliable information for the work they are doing, both in print and online.

I think that the lesson went well, the class was quieter by the end of the lesson than it has ever been before. They thought about what I was offering them over the course of the year ahead.

The next lessons will focus on finding information online.

A Zine adaptation of An Introduction to Using the Library

A zine (an abbreviation of fanzine, or magazine) is most commonly a small circulation self-published work of original or appropriated texts and images usually reproduced via photocopier.

In December I adapted a powerpoint presentation that I originally created to introduce students to the Dewey Decimal System into a general introduction to the Library. I did this as the original incarnation of the presentation was over-complicated and not very user-friendly.

I preferred the library introduction as it was simpler, shorter and had a better flow but I have found that students don’t learn from powerpoint presentations alone so I adapted it further.

Into a zine:

zine

zine1

zine2

zine3

zine4

I printed the A4 pages individually, then using a photocopier I copied them as an A5 booklet.

If youa re interested in creating a copy of the zine for use in your own school or library then you may download the pages here:

Introduction to the Library Zine download

Dewey Decimal Classification Card Game

For the past few months I have been tinkering with ways of teaching the Dewey Decimal Classification System to my students in a manner that does not make their eyes glaze over.

I am a bit of a stereotype as a Librarian inasmuch I love Dewey and what it does, but will admit that to the casual user it can seem a bit complicated andconfusing in places.

To that end I have designed a card game that can be used from Year 7 and up.
It is currently called the Dewey Decimal Classification Card Game but that lacks a certain je ne sans quoi, so if anyone comes up with a blinder of a game name please let me know!

I made test prints to see what they would look like and decided that the cards were a bit too stubby, so I lengthened them slightly as can be seen in this comparison between a first and second generation card.
ddc card game cards

These are the first eight cards I made, four from the Picture Deck and four from the Dewey Deck.
ddc card game

There are two decks, a Picture Deck and a Dewey Deck, with 32 cards in each.
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Each card is unique and has been created with posed Lego minifigures. I am currently creating supplementary cards which I will make available as soon as I am able.

The game rules are as follows:

Contents:

Each game set should have two decks, a Dewey Deck and a Picture Deck consisting of 32 cards each.

There should also be game rules, please note that players are welcome to adapt the game to the players.

Players encountering the Dewey Decimal Classification System for the first time can play the game using the main classes at the top of each card and at the end of the game get an extra point if they match up the Picture Card with the correct Dewey Card.

Advanced gamers and Librarians can play using the subject specific Dewey Numbers at the bottom of each card

Game Rules

Card Game:

Shuffle the decks but keep them separate

The aim of the game is to have no cards from either deck by the end of the game

Deal out both decks to people playing the game

The Picture Decks must remain face down in front of the players

All players must hold their Dewey cards

The person on the left of the dealer flips their first Picture Card (face up)

If the player to the left of the player that flipped the Picture Card cannot match it with a corresponding Dewey Card they must pick up the card and place it in the middle of their Picture Cards

If the player can match the Picture card with a Dewey Card then the two cards are placed face up next to each other in the middle of the player circle

This continues until a player runs out of Picture Cards

When this happens the Player with no Picture Cards must put down a Dewey Card and gameplay starts to go anti-clockwise

At this point players must swap their Picture Decks for their Dewey Decks

If the person to the right of that player cannot match a Picture Card to a Dewey Card then they must pick up the card

If a player runs out of Dewey Cards then the game reverts to the clockwise direction using Picture Cards

Gameplay can continue until all the cards are used or until a player runs out of both types of cards

Book Hunt:

This uses only the picture cards

Deal random cards from the Picture Deck to students and ask them to find a relevant book that will match up with the card

The winner is the student that finds the most books

Memory Game:

Place both decks of cards face down on a table

Flip one Picture Card and one Dewey Card

If you can match the Picture Card and the Dewey Card put them together, if not flip them face down again and try to match another two

You can download the beta deck and rules by clicking on the card image below
ddc card 13x

Or click here

Please note: the game is still in active development and as such the rules and cards may change with little to no warning. The game is stable enough to play.

The game is free to download, use and share but please credit Teen Librarian as the originating source if sharing with colleagues.

If you would like to offer comments, criticisms and suggestions on how the game can be improved, please leave them in the comments field below.

Huey, Louie & Melvil Dewey in: the Quest for the Missing Duck an Introduction to Using the Library

Many of you may recognize this slide presentation as it was originally an introduction to using the Dewey Decimal Classification System, but owing to a lot of feedback I received I decided to redo it as a general introduction to using the library as it was too cumbersome and complicated in it’s original form.

So with a few tweaks, language and slide changes may I present:

An Intro-duck-tion to Using the Library

“Every secondary school in the UK should have a good library” – call by MPs and Peers

A new report by Westminster politicians calls for every child in the UK to have a good library in their secondary school.

The Libraries All Party Parliamentary Group’s report calls for the Department for Education to start collecting figures about the number of schools that have a library and librarian, and for Ofsted to look at school library provision when they inspect a school. It is vital that all schools have a good library to ensure children develop essential literacy and digital literacy skills in order to fulfil their potential and to contribute to the success of the UK economy, says the report, The Beating Heart of the School.

See more at: http://www.cilip.org.uk/cilip/news/every-secondary-school-uk-should-have-good-library-call-mps-and-peers#sthash.mB72Iu5Y.dpuf

Three Years a School Librarian

In all the excitement over the CILIP Carnegie & Kate Greenaway Awards, coming to the end of another school year and the Football World Cup I overlooked the fact that this June is my third anniversary as a School Librarian.

For the eight years prior to this momentous month three years ago I had been (mostly) a Teen & Youth Services Librarian, with a bit of Reference, Adult Services and team management thrown in for good measure. Then the public services cuts started, at this point I was in Brent, a borough that cut its already tightly run library service into the bone. I was the first casualty in Brent and one of the first librarians in London to get the chop, the only upside to being at the front of the line was I could see what was coming and had six months to scramble for a new job before the axe came down.

I interviewed for 12 positions in six months and did well but not well enough in most.

It was in the final interview I went to that got me the call-back to run a library lesson on Anne Frank and biographies which went brilliantly until I turned round and realised that the computer that was running the powerpoint display I was using had downloaded an update and rebooted itself, it was Windows Vista so took about 20 minutes to sort itself out. I had decided not to wait for the reboot went on with the lesson using and got the kids to look at specific titles.

I left, convinced that I had blown it and cursed Microsoft products under my breath.

The lesson was a week before my post in Brent came to an end and I felt the breath of doom on my neck. My last day of work was on a Monday and on the Tuesday morning I was unemployed. I received a phone-call around midday on the Tuesday offering the post of School Librarian.

Three years later I am still here!

I have restocked the library, discarded ancient and unsuitable stock, physically removed broken bookshelves, organised about 25 author visits, gotten to know an entire schools worth of students (& staff), participated in two pantomimes and run an ongoing series of weekly lessons for years 7, 8 & 9 as well as all the other things that happen in a library but are usually handled by other teams.

I have learned a lot – how to survive being a solo practitioner, partnership working with school departments and new (to me) outside agencies.

One thing I did not have to do was learning this alone! There is a brilliant School Librarians Network who helped me and continue to do so and Librarians are some of the most avid & helpful Twitter users that I know and they guided me through the early stages of my new career path.

This summer my library is receiving a comprehensive refurbishment from the ground up – carpet, chairs, tables, a new coat of paint and an enhanced IT offer (five new computers).

I am looking forward to my fourth year and have started working on new educational resources to use in the new school year.
librarytrail lego mattimrie

The National Public Library Festival

Request a FREE Lego StoryStarter sample kit for your school!

The sample kit is a great way of finding out a bit more about StoryStarter, the new literacy resource for Key Stages 1 & 2, because it contains a selection of bricks, special elements and Minifigures that you’ll find in the full set as well as three small base plates on which to build your story.

legopic

Once you have your sample kit, use it to build a story of your choice, then video yourself or your pupils telling the story for your chance to win a class pack of StoryStarter worth £649.99*. Simply upload your video to YouTube then visit LEGOeducation.co.uk/StoryStarter to enter the competition. PLUS, the winning stories will all be made into a book and one overall winner will have their story made into a LEGO® animation!

You can find the request form here

Canadian Learning Commons book

The Canadian Library Association (CLA) is pleased to announce the launch of its latest publication Leading Learning: Standards of Practice for School Library Learning Commons in Canada at the annual CLA National Conference and Trade Show in Victoria, BC, on Friday, May 30th, 2014. This publication presents a model for the development and implementation of the school library as a library learning commons. It provides educators with a common set of standards of practice for moving forward. CLA President Marie DeYoung stated that the organization considers this publication as a “definitive learning support that is critical for all Canadian schools.”

http://clatoolbox.ca/casl/slic/llsop.pdf